Feed aggregator

Who Wants Night Vision Eye Drops?

Hackaday - 5 hours 56 minก่อน

A team of adventurous biohackers have successfully played with an interesting type of chlorophyll, called Chlorin e6 by putting it in their eyes… and the result? Well, they kind of obtained night vision.

Say what? Chlorin e6 is a chlorophyll analog that is found in deep-sea fish, and has been used to treat night blindness in humans (patent). There’s actually lots of research done with the substance, and it has even been used to treat different cancers — but most of the research was performed on lab rats.

So the team decided to take the next step — [Gabriel Licina] volunteered, and they squirted 50uL of e6 into his wide-stretched eyes. It kicks in after about an hour, so they headed outside at night to test his vision capabilities. They started by identifying basic shapes at 10 meters away, no larger than the size of his hand. Then they tried even larger distances. They had people stand at a tree line in different places, and [Gabriel] standing 50 meters away was able to point them out. The control group could barely identify them even a third of the time.

They’ve published a research paper on their findings, and it’s quite the interesting read. Perhaps in the future this can be manufactured in eye drop form for special use cases like hunting, military, or even search and rescue.

[via reddit]


Filed under: wearable hacks

Deals of the Day (3-30-2015)

Liliputing - จันทร์, 03/30/2015 - 23:30

A few days ago I noted that you could pick up an Acer Aspire Switch 10 2-in-1 Windows tablet for $249. If that price wasn’t tempting enough, today you can get the an even better version of the tablet for $50 less. Staples is selling the Acer Aspire Switch 10 with an Intel Atom Z3735F quad-core […]

Deals of the Day (3-30-2015) is a post from: Liliputing

Asus Transformer Book T100 Chi now available for $399 and up

Liliputing - จันทร์, 03/30/2015 - 22:09

The new 10 inch 2-in-1 convertible tablet Asus unveiled in January is now available for purchase. The Asus Transformer Book T100 Chi is a Windows tablet with a full HD display, an Intel Atom Bay Trail processor, and a starting price of $399 for a model with 32GB of storage. Asus will also offer a 64GB […]

Asus Transformer Book T100 Chi now available for $399 and up is a post from: Liliputing

Chromebooks with NVIDIA Tegra X1 chips on the way?

Liliputing - จันทร์, 03/30/2015 - 21:25

NVIDIA’s Tegra X1 processor is a 64-bit, processor based on an ARM Cortex-A57/Cortex-A53 architecture and featuring NVIDIA’s 256-core “Maxwell” graphics. It’s designed for use in a range of hardware including automotive systems, game consoles, and possibly handheld gaming devices. It might also show up in next-gen Chromebooks. CNX Software reports that Chromium OS developers have been adding […]

Chromebooks with NVIDIA Tegra X1 chips on the way? is a post from: Liliputing

Injecting SD Card Bootloaders

Hackaday - จันทร์, 03/30/2015 - 21:00

[Frank] has a Ultimaker2 and wanted to install a new bootloader for the microcontroller without having physical access to the circuitry. That means installing a new bootloader for the ATMega2560 without an In System Programmer, and as is usual on AVRs, the bootloader can only be edited with an ISP. Additionally, modifying the bootloader in any way runs the risk of corruption and a bricked circuit. That’s okay, because [Frank] knows how to do it, and he’s here to show you how.

You can think of the memory layout of the ATMega in the Ultimaker as being split in half, with the printer firmware in the first half and the bootloader in the second half. There’s extra space in both halves, and that’s something that comes in very useful. When the circuit powers up, it jumps to the bootloader, does it’s thing, then jumps to the very beginning of the application code – a vector table – that starts up the actual firmware.

[Frank]’s trick to adding on to the bootloader is to place the SD card bootloader in the space normally reserved for applications, not where you would expect to find a bootloader. This code is accessed by the stock bootloader jumping into a modified vector table at the beginning of the application data that points to new executable code. That code is the actual SD card bootloader, but because it is in the application part of the memory, it can’t perform Flash writing or erasing. To fix that, a tiny bit of code is tacked onto the end of the bootloader for performing Flash writes and jumps back to the application part of memory.


Filed under: Microcontrollers

MediaTek introduces Helio X and Helio P chips for high-end phones

Liliputing - จันทร์, 03/30/2015 - 20:05

Chinese chip maker MediaTek has been gaining some serious traction in the smartphone and tablet space over the past few years. While most of the company’s chips are cheaper and less powerful than the latest Qualcomm, Samsung, or NVIDIA processors, MediaTek offers a few higher-performance 64-bit, octa-core processors. Now MediaTek has unveiled two new series […]

MediaTek introduces Helio X and Helio P chips for high-end phones is a post from: Liliputing

Thar be Beer in These Walls

Hackaday - จันทร์, 03/30/2015 - 18:01

When you need a cold one and walking downstairs to your twin-keg refrigerator just won’t do, it’s time to break out the tools to deliver that frothy goodness where it’s needed. And so began [DaveLondres’] inspiring tale of piping beer through the walls of his home.

Now we know what you’re thinking… that beer is going to get mighty warm sitting in long lines from the fridge up to the ground floor. [Dave] thought about that too and designed a double-pipe system to overcome the issue. A run of PVC pipe for each keg connect the in-wall taps to holes drilled in the side of a second-hand fridge. An ingenious branching job yields an extra port for each run which was fitted with computer case fans to keep the cold air circulating. Plastic tubing is snaked inside of the PVC to carry the beer.

Rounding out the craftsmanship on this one is the inclusion of a plumbed drain to whisk away the drippings. If you’re not going to have a beautifully adorned chest-freezer-gone-kegerator in your livingroom this is the best alternative we’ve seen.

[via reddit]


Filed under: Beer Hacks, home hacks

Thar be Beer in These Walls

Hackaday - จันทร์, 03/30/2015 - 18:01

When you need a cold one and walking downstairs to your twin-keg refrigerator just won’t do, it’s time to break out the tools to deliver that frothy goodness where it’s needed. And so began [DaveLondres’] inspiring tale of piping beer through the walls of his home.

Now we know what you’re thinking… that beer is going to get mighty warm sitting in long lines from the fridge up to the ground floor. [Dave] thought about that too and designed a double-pipe system to overcome the issue. A run of PVC pipe for each keg connect the in-wall taps to holes drilled in the side of a second-hand fridge. An ingenious branching job yields an extra port for each run which was fitted with computer case fans to keep the cold air circulating. Plastic tubing is snaked inside of the PVC to carry the beer.

Rounding out the craftsmanship on this one is the inclusion of a plumbed drain to whisk away the drippings. If you’re not going to have a beautifully adorned chest-freezer-gone-kegerator in your livingroom this is the best alternative we’ve seen.

[via reddit]


Filed under: Beer Hacks, home hacks

Modern Tools From Old Table Saws

Hackaday - จันทร์, 03/30/2015 - 15:00

Somehow or another, the modern hackerspace isn’t centered around table saws, drill presses, band saws, lathes, or mills. The 3D printer and laser cutter are the tools of the future. No one has yet figured out how to build a 3D printer or laser cutter out of several hundred pounds of cast iron, so until then [Chad] will lead the charge modifying old table saws into these modern machine tools.

The build logs for the laser engraver and 3D printer are pic heavy and text lean, but there’s enough detail to make a few educated guesses. Both of these machines use Craftsman table saws from the early to mid 1950s for the chassis. Inside each chassis, the rails, belts, and shafts that make up a Cartesian bot are installed, and the electronics are tucked gently inside.

There’s a lot of creativity in this build; the electronics for the 3D printer are tucked away in the shell of the old motor. For the laser cutter, the focus adjustment is the same knob that used to lock the blade at an angle.

While this may look like a waste of two beautiful tools, keep in mind these are equivalent to contractor saws you can pick up at Home Depot for $500 today. They’re not professional cabinet saws, they just look really pretty. They’re still a solid piece of metal, though, and refurbishing the frames into useful tools is probably the best thing you could do with them.

Thanks [Frankie] for the tip.


Filed under: tool hacks

WiFi Sucks for RC Vehicles, Upgrade to 3G

Hackaday - จันทร์, 03/30/2015 - 12:01

This is the Kyosho Blizzard, a tracked remote control vehicle that’s a blast to take out in the rapidly retreating snowpack. [Antibore] was interested in performance testing the range of the thing. It includes a camera that streams video back to a tablet or smartphone. Both the video and the controls use WiFi for communications. As he expected, the rover loses control signal at about fifty meters, with the video has a disappointing twenty meter limit. His workaround is to saddle the crawler with a 3G bridge. Not a bad idea that may be feasibly completed with hardware you have on hand.

In this case he grabbed a Beagleboard-XM. It runs embedded Linux and has USB ports which is perfect for the other two parts of the added hardware: a Huawei E230 3G dongle and a WiFi dongle. This means no alterations to the rover were necessary. He set up OpenVPN and performed a few other tweaks. The WiFi signal is constant, as the transmitter and receiver are both attached to the rover. We just wonder about the latency of the 3G traffic. Let’s hear your thoughts on that in the comments below.

We would be remiss if we didn’t tie-in the potential of this hack. Previously this winter we saw a Kyosho with a 3D printed snow thrower attached to the front. More snow removal power, arguably unlimited range… you can do your entire block from the comfort of the couch. To the Future!


Filed under: toy hacks, wireless hacks

Internet Knows Your Every Move Thanks to IKEA and ESP8266

Hackaday - จันทร์, 03/30/2015 - 09:01

[terenceang] got his feet wet with the ESP8266 WiFi module by hacking up an IKEA Molgan PIR light. The stock PIR light simply lights when motion is detected. [terenceang] added some extra functionality to it by making it send notifications to his phone as well.

The default configuration of the stock PIR light was to only work at night. This is done with a photo diode. It was removed to make it work in daylight, along with several other components. He removed a handful of current limiting resistors to disable the hi output LEDs. One was preserved as a visual indicator. The onboard voltage regulator didn’t supply enough current for the ESP8266. [terenceang] used some electronic wizardry and was able to solve the problem with an opto-coupler.

The one thing he would change is moving from battery to mains power, as expected battery life is less than two weeks.Schematics, source code and tons of great pictures are available on his blog. If you want to give it a try but need a crash course check out the recent news that the Arduino IDE works with ESP8266, or give direct programming a try.


Filed under: wireless hacks

Hackaday Links: March 29, 2015

Hackaday - จันทร์, 03/30/2015 - 06:00

Every once in a while, the Hackaday Overlords have a Hardware Developers Didactic Galactic in San Francisco. Last week was #06 featuring [Mike Estee] from Othermill and Hackaday writer [Joshua Vasquez] talking about synthesizing an SPI slave in an FPGA. Video here.

It’s no secret that [Fran] is building a DSKY – the part of the Apollo guidance computer that was on-screen in Apollo 13. It’s time for a project update, and here’s where she stands: if anyone has a source of JAN-spec Teledyne 420 or 422-series magnetic latching relays (they’re in a TO-5 package), contact [Fran]. The backplane connector has been identified; it’s a Teradyne I/O 100 series connector with a 120mil spacing. Contact [Fran] if you know where to get them.

Let’s say you want a carbon fiber quadcopter frame. What’s the most reasonable thing you can do? 3D print a CNC machine, obviously. That’s a 200mm FPV racer cut from 1mm and 3mm carbon fiber sheets, but the real story here is the CNC machine. It’s a PortalCyclone, and even the cable chains are 3D printed.

What does an AMOLED display look like up close? Pretty cool, actually. That’s 20x magnification, and it’s not a Bayer filter. Can anyone fill us in on the reason for that?

Laser cutters are tricky if you want to do grayscale or half tones. [oni305] made an Inkscape extension to generate better GCode for engraving with a laser cutter.

19″ racks have no dimensions that are actually 19″. Also 2x4s aren’t 2 inches by four inches. Somehow, a 2×4 server rack works.


Filed under: Hackaday Columns, Hackaday links

Measuring Alcohol Content With Time of Flight Sensors

Hackaday - จันทร์, 03/30/2015 - 03:00

[Chris] is a homebrewer – the tasty kind – and wanted a way to track the rate of specific gravity against temperature. Tracking temperature is easy, all you need is a 1-wire temperature probe hooked up to the microcontroller of your choice. Logging the rate of fermentation isn’t as simple, but with a time of flight sensor, a hydrometer, and some pool toys, [Chris] kludged something together that works reasonably well.

Specific gravity, and thus fermentation, has been measured for centuries with hydrometers. Not wanting to complicate matters with electronic sensors, [Chris] built a floating cage for his hydrometer out of a clear tube, a kick board, and a few bits of styrofoam. By placing a Sparkfun time of flight sensor at the top of the tube, and lowering the hydrometer into his fermentation bucket, [Chris] can measure the height of the hydrometer above the level of the liquid in his fermentation bucket.

Both the temperature and specific gravity are logged to a Raspberry Pi, and after combing through this data [Chris] can see a big ‘bump’ in the specific gravity due to a mass of foam, tapering down to the desired values after a day or so.


Filed under: Beer Hacks

Free PCB Sunday: Pick your PCB

dangerous prototype - จันทร์, 03/30/2015 - 01:00

We go through a lot of prototype PCBs, and end up with lots of extras that we’ll never use. Every Sunday we give away a few PCBs from one of our past or future projects, or a related prototype. Our PCBs are made through Seeed Studio’s Fusion board service. This week two random commenters will get a coupon code for the free PCB drawer tomorrow morning. Pick your own PCB. You get unlimited free PCBs now – finish one and we’ll send you another! Don’t forget there’s free PCBs three times every week:

Some stuff:

  • Yes, we’ll mail it anywhere in the world!
  • Be sure to use a real e-mail in the address field so we can contact you with the coupon.
  • Limit one PCB per address per month please.
  • Like everything else on this site, PCBs are offered without warranty.
  • PCBs are scrap and have no value, due to limited supply it is not possible to replace a board lost in the post

Be the first to comment, subscribe to the RSS feed.

App note: EMC guidelines for microcontroller-based applications

dangerous prototype - จันทร์, 03/30/2015 - 00:00

Application note(PDF) specific on microcontroller EMC from ST Microelectronics.

Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) must be taken into account at the very beginning of a project as the cost of correcting an EMC problem encountered at the start of production can be far greater that the cost of a detailed EMC study during the development phase of an application.

The use of microcontroller-based systems is increasingly wide-spread, especially in such areas as consumer, industrial and automotive applications, where the drive for cost reduction is the common trend. This emphasis on cost reduction and the increasing complexity of such systems requires the manufacturers of semiconductor components to develop highly integrated, single chip, high operating frequency microcontrollers using the highest density technology possible. Unfortunately, for semiconductor structures, the higher the density and the faster the operation, intrinsically the higher the level of electrical noise generated, and the increased sensitivity to spikes induced from external noise. Therefore, the PCB layout, the software and the system must now apply EMC “hardening” techniques in their design.

This note aims to provide guidelines for designers of microcontroller-based applications so that the optimum level of EMC performances can be achieved.

3D Printed Mechanical Keyboard

Hackaday - จันทร์, 03/30/2015 - 00:00

Tired of buying boring keyboards with almost no customization available? We’ve seen lots of keyboard hacks before, but if you want to take it a step further — why not make it from scratch and have it 3D printed?

Reddit user [Wildpanic] has just finished his first attempt at a 3D printed keyboard and he’s even shared the files to make it over at Thingiverse. The frame is entirely 3D printed, but he’s chosen to use pre-manufactured key switches, which is probably for the best. They are the Cherry MX Green variety, which have these little clips in the side which make them super easy to install — especially on a 3D printed frame.

He’s wired them all using 20ga copper wire (which might be a bit overkill) to a Teensy 2.0 microcontroller. The diodes he chosen to use are 1N4148 which he was able to get fairly inexpensively. Total cost is just a bit over $50. Not bad!

Oh and in case you’re wondering, he’s chosen the style of keyboard that makes use of 4 keys for the space bar — as made popular by the planck style custom keyboards — you know, for people who love symmetry.

For more awesome keyboard hacks, check out this roundup [Adam Fabio] put together in a Hacklet last year!

[via reddit]


Filed under: 3d Printer hacks, Microcontrollers

Next-gen NVIDIA Shield portable game console coming soon

Liliputing - อาทิตย์, 03/29/2015 - 21:32

This month NVIDIA announced plans to launch its first video game console designed to live next to your TV. But the new $199 NVIDIA Shield game console might not be the company’s only new Shield device on the way. The 2-year-old NVIDIA Shield handheld game console may be due for an update as well. New listings […]

Next-gen NVIDIA Shield portable game console coming soon is a post from: Liliputing

Electric Skateboard Rev’ed to Version 2

Hackaday - อาทิตย์, 03/29/2015 - 21:01

What’s cooler than a sweet skateboard? A sweet electric skateboard! And the only thing cooler than that is a DIY electric skateboard. [comsa42] has proven to be a DIY electric skateboard aficionado with his new project. It’s a rebuild and upgrade from his electric longboard that has previously been featured on Hackaday.

The most noticeable change is the size of the deck, it was cut down to be 31 inches long to enhance its maneuverability. The electronics are housed in an updated fiberglass compartment that attaches to the bottom of the deck. The old compartment had a large port that had to be removed in order to charge the battery. The new compartment has a plug for easily connecting the charger.

The drive components still consist of a brushless DC motor, RC hobby ESC and a LiPo battery. Previously, an RC transmitter and receiver were used to control the motor. [comsa42] wrote an app for his phone to send throttle signals to a Bluetooth module which controls the ESC as well as relays battery life back to the phone.

We think this project is pretty rad and wouldn’t mind taking this skate for a spin around the block.


Filed under: transportation hacks

HTC One E9+ smartphone with a 5.5 inch screen launched in China

Liliputing - อาทิตย์, 03/29/2015 - 20:22

HTC’s latest flagship smartphone for the US and European markets is the 5 inch HTC One M9 with a metal case. But the company just introduced a larger, partly plastic model in China called the HTC One E9+. The phone also has a MediaTek processor rather than a Qualcomm chip. The main website for the […]

HTC One E9+ smartphone with a 5.5 inch screen launched in China is a post from: Liliputing

App note: EMC general information

dangerous prototype - อาทิตย์, 03/29/2015 - 20:00

Application note(PDF) on EMC from ST Microelectronics.

Because many electronic circuits are in proximity to each other, it is essential that their design is not affected by external noise sources and that the circuit itself is not a noise source affecting other circuits. This relationship is known as electromagnetic compatibility or EMC.

Sources of electromagnetic noise are numerous and have both natural and man-made origins. Natural sources below 10 MHz are dominated by the atmospheric noise generated by electrical storms. Above 10 MHz, natural sources consist primarily of cosmic noise and solar radiation.

Man-made noise include AM, FM, TV and other broadcast transmitters, mobiles radios but also computing devices, motors, appliances, power lines, auto ignition systems and many others. With the proliferation of these sources (particularly in urban areas), electromagnetic noise has reached important levels.

Syndicate content