Feed aggregator

Homemade Portable Gold Mining Trommel

Hackaday - 4 hours 57 minก่อน

[TheJogdredge] has been testing out his new gold washing machines that he made at home. By running dirt laced with rocks through his DIY devices, gold and precious materials can be filtered through. A video of the process can be seen embedded below.

The entire gold mining system is 100% homemade and is powered by a dependable Honda GX120 motor. The machines are meant to be easily lugged around from site to site and were designed with portability in mind.

No plastic parts were used in the system, making these trommels extremely durable and sturdy. Roughly, the rig weighs about 240 pounds dry, and approximately 265 soaking wet with a sluice box attached. The rubber tires allow for the machine to be maneuvered from place to place without much hassle.

Although the parts are described on the website, no how-to instructions for this specific device can be found online. This is probably due to the fact that [TheJogdredge] is trying to sell his products and make some money. Releasing the instructions on how to build your own would most likely cut into the potential profits of his design. Regardless of which, this is portable gold mining trommel and perfect for those looking to step up their gold mining and prospecting game.

 


Filed under: hardware

GPS Tracker Tracks Your Stolen Bike

Hackaday - 7 hours 55 minก่อน

Bikes are great for cruising through congested cities but there is a serious downside to pedaling your two-wheeler around… bike theft. It’s a big deal, for example, yearly estimates for stolen bikes in NYC are in the 60,000 – 100,000 range. Only an extremely small percentage of those are ever recovered. [stbennett] just got himself a halfway decent bike and is not too interested in having it stolen, and if it is stolen, he wants a way to find it so he built himself a GPS tracker for his bike.

The entire project is Arduino-based. It uses a GSM Shield and a GPS module along with a few other small odds and ends. A 2-cell LiPo battery provides the required power for all of the components. It’s pretty neat how this device maintains an extremely long battery life. The metal cable of the bike lock is used as a conductor in the circuit. When the cable is inserted and locked into the lock housing a circuit is completed that prevents electricity from passing through a transistor to the Arduino. In other words, the Arduino is off unless the bike cable is cut or disengaged. That way it is not running 24/7 and draining the battery.

The entire system works like this, once the bike lock cable is cut, the Arduino wakes up and gives a 15 second delay before doing anything, allowing the legitimate user to reconnect the bike lock and shut down the alarm system. If the bike lock is not re-engaged, the unit starts looking for a GPS signal. At that time it will send out SMS messages with the GPS location coordinates. Punching those numbers into Google Maps will show you exactly where the bike is.

Of course your other option is to park your bike where nobody else can access it, like at the top of a lamp pole.


Filed under: transportation hacks

Lilbits (9-02-2014): Android One is coming (to India)

Liliputing - 9 hours 57 minก่อน

Earlier this summer Google introduced a new initiative called Android One. The idea is to partner with device makers to offer low-cost, high-quality Android phones that run Google approved software. The first Android One devices are expected to be offered in India and they could sell for around $100. Now Google has started sending out […]

Lilbits (9-02-2014): Android One is coming (to India) is a post from: Liliputing

Lilbits (9-02-2014): Android One is coming (to India)

Liliputing - 9 hours 57 minก่อน

Earlier this summer Google introduced a new initiative called Android One. The idea is to partner with device makers to offer low-cost, high-quality Android phones that run Google approved software. The first Android One devices are expected to be offered in India and they could sell for around $100. Now Google has started sending out […]

Lilbits (9-02-2014): Android One is coming (to India) is a post from: Liliputing

THP Semifinalist: Autonomous Recharging For Multirotors

Hackaday - 10 hours 56 minก่อน

Even with visions of quadcopters buzzing around metropolitan areas delivering everything from pizzas to toilet paper fresh in the minds of tech blogospherites, There’s been a comparatively small amount of research into how to support squadrons of quadcopters and other unmanned aerial vehicles. The most likely cause of this is the FAA’s reactionary position towards UAVs. Good thing [Giovanni] is performing all his research for autonomous recharging and docking for multirotors in Australia, then.

The biggest obstacle of autonomous charging of a quadcopter is landing a quad exactly where the charging station is; run of the mill GPS units only have a resolution of about half a meter, and using a GPS solution would require putting GPS on the charging station as well. The solution comes from powerful ARM single board computers – in this case, an Odroid u3 – along with a USB webcam, OpenCV and a Pixhawk autopilot.

Right now [Giovanni] is still working out the kinks on his software system, but he has all the parts and the right tools to get this project up in the air, down, and back up again.

The project featured in this post is a semifinalist in The Hackaday Prize.


Filed under: drone hacks, The Hackaday Prize

MOTA SmartRing: Because smartwatches are too… I dunno

Liliputing - 10 hours 57 minก่อน

Electronics companies seem to be banking on smartwatches being the next big thing. Practically every major device maker has already announced one or is expected to launch one soon. MOTA already has a smartwatch… so the company’s taking the next (il)logical step and announcing something smaller: meet the MOTA SmartRing. Seriously. I think. The SmartRing […]

MOTA SmartRing: Because smartwatches are too… I dunno is a post from: Liliputing

MOTA SmartRing: Because smartwatches are too… I dunno

Liliputing - 10 hours 57 minก่อน

Electronics companies seem to be banking on smartwatches being the next big thing. Practically every major device maker has already announced one or is expected to launch one soon. MOTA already has a smartwatch… so the company’s taking the next (il)logical step and announcing something smaller: meet the MOTA SmartRing. Seriously. I think. The SmartRing […]

MOTA SmartRing: Because smartwatches are too… I dunno is a post from: Liliputing

HP Envy x2 2-in-1 tablets with Broadwell chips outed a bit early

Liliputing - 11 hours 56 minก่อน

It looks like HP may be preparing to launch a new line of 2-in-1 tablets that become notebooks with the aid of tablet docks. German website WinFuture spotted a few retail listings for unannounced products called the HP Envy 13 x2 and HP Envy 15 x2. Both computers seem to be Windows machines with full […]

HP Envy x2 2-in-1 tablets with Broadwell chips outed a bit early is a post from: Liliputing

HP Envy x2 2-in-1 tablets with Broadwell chips outed a bit early

Liliputing - 11 hours 56 minก่อน

It looks like HP may be preparing to launch a new line of 2-in-1 tablets that become notebooks with the aid of tablet docks. German website WinFuture spotted a few retail listings for unannounced products called the HP Envy 13 x2 and HP Envy 15 x2. Both computers seem to be Windows machines with full […]

HP Envy x2 2-in-1 tablets with Broadwell chips outed a bit early is a post from: Liliputing

Zotac’s first mini PC with Windows 8.1 now available for $220

Liliputing - 12 hours 56 minก่อน

Zotac has been offering small form-factor computers for the past few years, but the company typically sells computers without an operating system. Recently Zotac announced that it would begin offering a handful of models with Windows 8.1 and now the first one is available. You can pick up a Zotac ZBOX BI320 with an Intel […]

Zotac’s first mini PC with Windows 8.1 now available for $220 is a post from: Liliputing

Zotac’s first mini PC with Windows 8.1 now available for $220

Liliputing - 12 hours 56 minก่อน

Zotac has been offering small form-factor computers for the past few years, but the company typically sells computers without an operating system. Recently Zotac announced that it would begin offering a handful of models with Windows 8.1 and now the first one is available. You can pick up a Zotac ZBOX BI320 with an Intel […]

Zotac’s first mini PC with Windows 8.1 now available for $220 is a post from: Liliputing

Rigging Your 3D Models In The Real-World

Hackaday - 13 hours 57 minก่อน

Computer animation is a task both delicate and tedious, requiring the manipulation of a computer model into a series of poses over time saved as keyframes, further refined by adjusting how the computer interpolates between each frame. You need a rig (a kind of digital skeleton) to accurately control that model, and researcher [Alec Jacobson] and his team have developed a hands-on alternative to pushing pixels around.

Control curves (the blue circles) allow for easier character manipulation.

The skeletal systems of computer animated characters consists of kinematic chains—joints that sprout from a root node out to the smallest extremity. Manipulating those joints usually requires the addition of easy-to-select control curves, which simplify the way joints rotate down the chain. Control curves do some behind-the-curtain math that allows the animator to move a character by grabbing a natural end-node, such as a hand or a foot. Lifting a character’s foot to place it on chair requires manipulating one control curve: grab foot control, move foot. Without these curves, an animator’s work is usually tripled: she has to first rotate the joint where the leg meets the hip, sticking the leg straight out, then rotate the knee back down, then rotate the ankle. A nightmare.

[Alec] and his team’s unique alternative is a system of interchangeable, 3D-printed mechanical pieces used to drive an on-screen character. The effect is that of digital puppetry, but with an eye toward precision. Their device consists of a central controller, joints, splitters, extensions, and endcaps. Joints connected to the controller appear in the 3D environment in real-time as they are assembled, and differences between the real-world rig and the model’s proportions can be adjusted in the software or through plastic extension pieces.

The plastic joints spin in all 3 directions (X,Y,Z), and record measurements via embedded Hall sensors and permanent magnets. Check out the accompanying article here (PDF) for specifics on the articulation device, then hang around after the break for a demonstration video.

[Thanks Sam]


Filed under: 3d Printer hacks, software hacks

Chinese device makers launch 7 inch Windows tablets

Liliputing - 13 hours 57 minก่อน

There’s no shortage of Windows 8.1 tablets with 8 inch screens. But you know what’s tough to find? A model with a 7 inch screen. A couple of Chinese companies are looking to change that. Cube and Ramos have both recently unveiled 7 inch tablets with Intel Atom Bay Trail processors and Windows 8.1 software. […]

Chinese device makers launch 7 inch Windows tablets is a post from: Liliputing

Chinese device makers launch 7 inch Windows tablets

Liliputing - 13 hours 57 minก่อน

There’s no shortage of Windows 8.1 tablets with 8 inch screens. But you know what’s tough to find? A model with a 7 inch screen. A couple of Chinese companies are looking to change that. Cube and Ramos have both recently unveiled 7 inch tablets with Intel Atom Bay Trail processors and Windows 8.1 software. […]

Chinese device makers launch 7 inch Windows tablets is a post from: Liliputing

Deals of the Day (9-02-2014)

Liliputing - อังคาร, 09/02/2014 - 23:09

The Acer Aspire Switch 10 is a Windows tablet with an Intel Atom Bay Trail processor, a 10 inch screen, and a detachable keyboard dock that lets you use the tablet like a notebook. You can even flip the screen around so it faces away from the keyboard if you want to just treat the […]

Deals of the Day (9-02-2014) is a post from: Liliputing

Android Wear updates will add Bluetooth headset support, GPS, and more

Liliputing - อังคาร, 09/02/2014 - 22:00

The first smartwatches featuring Google’s Android Wear software began shipping a few months ago, but a second round of Android Wear devices from companies including Asus, Motorola, LG, and Sony are on the way. Some will stand out thanks to their circular watch faces. Others hope to make a splash thanks to low price tags. […]

Android Wear updates will add Bluetooth headset support, GPS, and more is a post from: Liliputing

webOS rises from the ashes (again) as LuneOS: open source operating system for phones and tablets

Liliputing - อังคาร, 09/02/2014 - 21:11

The operating system that once powered devices like the Palm Pre and the HP TouchPad is getting another crack at life. A group of developers have taken the source code HP released a few years ago and turned it into something new(ish) called LuneOS. While the software is still very much a work in progress, […]

webOS rises from the ashes (again) as LuneOS: open source operating system for phones and tablets is a post from: Liliputing

30 Years later TED finds his voice: A Commodore Story Part I

Hackaday - อังคาร, 09/02/2014 - 21:01

MOS VICC II Video Interface Chip

MOS SID Chip Sound Interface Device

In the before-time (I’m talking about the 1980’s here), when home computers were considered to be consumer items, there was the Commodore C64. The C64 derived its vast array of superpowers from two Integrated Circuits (IC) named VIC and SID standing for Video Interface Chip and Sound Interface Device. Chip names were part of our culture back them, from VIC up to Fat AGNES in the end.

We spoke about VIC and SID as if they were people or distant relatives, sometimes cantankerous or prone to sudden outburst, but there was always an underlying respect for the chips and the engineers who made them. VIC and SID together made one of the world’s best video and sound experiences; movement and noise, musical notes and aliens.

I was going on my second week as a young upstart engineer working for Commodore in the offices above the MOS chip fab building, when the head of engineering and my boss, [Shiraz Shivji], pulled me into his office. It had been a blusterous two weeks with un-imagined technology ever-present and spilling out from the offices as one roamed the halls. Video games played in one out of every two doorways causing one to wonder how many people were working, how many just goofing off, and how many were doing both at the same time.

I had already been on my own whirlwind tour of duty in that short time. 25 years after I went to work for Commodore I found out by reading [Brain Bagnal’s] book On the Edge that I had been hired only as a lowly technician. I had been immediately upgraded to programmer on my first day to fill in for a programmer who was out on vacation. They put me in his chair in a small office with 2 other people. All of the offices held three people at most; if we could have dispensed with the door we undoubtedly would have had four stuffed in the same space.

This office was unlike any other office. This office had a large collection of spider plants. I felt blessed to be working at Commodore and even more so sitting in the only office with green growing things.

Standing Silent: Former MOS Semiconductor in King Of Prussia PA

I didn’t get any of my software assignment done, I literally couldn’t sit in a chair with so much wonder in the air, I kept ending up in the hardware labs. On Friday of the first week I became the victim of what we called back then a “drive-by”. The head of engineering was passing by me in the hall when he stopped my foursome wanting to talk about chip yield. Somehow out of this group I was the guy picked to represent the Engineering R&D Department at that particular moment.

I must have done well, and I’m sure I’ll share that full story another time. The short of it was that I solved a problem rather than just having averted blame. The next time I was pulled into [Shiraz’s] office felt like another drive-by. I sat down attentively ready for my new mission. What I lacked in training and experience I was going to try and make up with exuberance.

ZX Spectrum

[Shiraz] opened a Commodore-made file cabinet (and you thought we just made computers) and showed me a Timex/Sinclair Spectrum. There it sat on my side of the desk; the competition, those that would steal our lunch money to feed themselves. The Enemy.

Commodore C116 – 1980 Computer

I was put in charge of the newest computer in that moment, no doubt as punishment for spending all my time in the hardware lab. I was introduced to TED, the Text Display chip, our newest single chip computer system. I didn’t mention that we had previously met, afraid that the wrong words would get me thrown off the project as quickly as I had just come on board.

A bit more of the conversations and issues surrounding the Commodore TED family can be seen in this video I made a few years back.

The standard stories aside, something happened this year when I found a rare version of the TED machine and took it to VCF with me. This TED was different from most, this one could speak to you.

Texas Instruments TI Speak and Spell from the 1980’s

This is back in the day when only one device was known to speak, the TI Speak and Spell. So naturally Commodore went and hired, or stole, maybe coerced, the very engineering talent that gave the Speak and Spell his voice. And now TED would speak with that voice, I still remember the day TED cleared his throat and spoke, he mispronounced a few words but it was a wholly wondrous moment in time, or least in my life.

What did TED have to say? That’s a story for a different day. Keep checking Hackaday for Part 2 of my story.

[Photo of MOS Building courtesy of Fran Blanche]
[Photo of C64 Motherboard courtesy of Bill Bertram]

 


Filed under: Featured, news

HP Stream 7, 8 Windows tablets pop up in Europe

Liliputing - อังคาร, 09/02/2014 - 20:29

HP plans to launch a cheap Windows tablet called the HP Stream 7. While the company hasn’t officially announced the product yet, Microsoft mentioned the tablet in July as an example of inexpensive new Windows machines on the way. Now the folks at Mobile Geeks have spotted a retail listing for the tablet which gives us a […]

HP Stream 7, 8 Windows tablets pop up in Europe is a post from: Liliputing

Giada D330 is a compact, Haswell-powered PC

Liliputing - อังคาร, 09/02/2014 - 19:30

Tiny PC maker Giada has unveiled a new small form-factor desktop computer that’s powered by an Intel Haswell processor. The Giada D330 is a barebones PC which is about 2 inches thickand which support sup to an Intel Core i7 processor. Giada’s targeting system builders and DIY-minded folks interested in building their own little desktop […]

Giada D330 is a compact, Haswell-powered PC is a post from: Liliputing

Logicthai Shop

LogicStamp8fx ราคา 180 บาท

USB to TTL module ใช้ชิพ PL2303 ราคา 150 บาท

USB Power module พร้อมสาย USB ราคา 70 บาท

ชุดลงปริ้นท์ freeduinomax232ssAtmega168 ราคา 450 บาท

แผ่นปริ้นท์ freeduinomax232ss เกรด A ราคา 70 บาท

ชุดคิท freeduinomax232ssAtmega168 ราคา 320 บาท

สาย RS232 ราคา 70 บาท DC อะแดปเตอร์ 9 volt ราคา 150 บาท

ค่าส่ง EMS 60 บาท

การใช้งานชุด freeduinomax232ss จะต้องประกอบด้วย ตัวบอร์ด, สาย RS232, อะแดปเตอร์ 9 โวลท์ชนิดที่มีขั้วบวกอยู่ตรงกลาง

ผู้สนใจสั่งซื้อสินค้าส่งเมล์มาที่ sales(at)ลอจิกไทยดอทเนท

สมาชิก ส่งรายการสั่งซื้อและที่อยู่โดยเข้าเมนู contact

Syndicate content