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Scare off Squirrels and Tweet about It with the Jack-O’-Lantern Warning System

Hackaday - 3 hours 59 minก่อน

[Stephpalm] had carved a pumpkin for the first time in two decades. Unfortunately, the neighborhood squirrels were all too pleased with her work and devoured it. Her original goal for the jack-o’-lantern was to have its lights controlled over the internet. These hungry critters inspired another project instead – The Jack-’o’-Lantern Squirrel Early Warning System. There have been hacks that have dealt with pesky squirrels before, such as a trap and an automatic water turret, but they didn’t have the ability to post to social media like this system does.

The system consists of a Spark Core, a passive infrared (PIR) sensor, and a piezo buzzer. When the motion sensor is triggered the buzzer sounds, scaring away any peckish creatures lurking nearby. [Stephpalm] used an NPN transistor and 1k-Ohm resistor to provide enough current to drive the buzzer. All of these components were connected using jumper wires and a breadboard that sits on top of the pumpkin. As a nod to her original idea, [stephpalm] then created “Pumpkin Watch Code” and loaded it into the Core. It posts preset messages to a Twitter account every 45 minutes of inactivity or whenever a pesky squirrel is detected. The messages can be personalized for anyone who wants to make one of these themselves.

We wonder if it would be better to place the breadboard inside the jack-o’-lantern and carve out a couple of holes on top for the PIR sensor’s wires to come out of. That would offer some protection from the elements and prevent it from getting knocked over. We think this project could be adapted for many other uses. After the break, see a video of the system in action!

[via Instructables]


Filed under: Holiday Hacks

Zotac ZBOX PI320 pico tiny Windows PC giveaway

Liliputing - 4 hours 59 minก่อน

The Zotac ZBOX PI320 pico is a desktop computer that’s about the size of a smartphone. It measures 4.6″ x 2.6″ x 0.8″ but the little machine has room for 3 USB ports, HDMI output, and an Ethernet jack, among other things. It also comes with Windows 8.1 pre-loaded. The ZBOX PI320 pico sells for $200, but […]

Zotac ZBOX PI320 pico tiny Windows PC giveaway is a post from: Liliputing

Tronsmart Draco AW80 TV box has octa-core CPU, up to 4GB RAM

Liliputing - 5 hours 59 minก่อน

Google’s $99 Nexus Player is now available for purchase and it should ship in early November. I’m just starting to test the TV box and while I really like the new Android TV user interface, until more third-party developers adapt their apps to the platform, there’s a relatively small number of things you can actually […]

Tronsmart Draco AW80 TV box has octa-core CPU, up to 4GB RAM is a post from: Liliputing

Reverse Engineering the D-Link WPS Pin Algorithm

Hackaday - 6 hours 59 minก่อน

A router with WPS requires a PIN to allow other devices to connect, and this PIN should be unique to every router and not derived from other easily accessible data found on the router. When [Craig] took a look at the firmware of a D-Link DIR-810L 802.11ac router, he found exactly the opposite; the WPS PIN was easily decipherable because it was generated entirely from the router’s MAC address and could be reverse engineered by sniffing WiFi.

When [Craig] was taking a look at the disassembled firmware from his router, he noticed a bit of code that accessed the NVRAM used for storing device-specific information like a serial number. This bit of code wasn’t retrieving a WPS pin, but the WAN MAC address instead. Instead of being unique to each device and opaque to every other bit of data on the router, the WPS pin was simply generated (with a bit of math) from the MAC address. This means anyone upstream of the router can easily derive the WPS pin of the router, and essentially gives everyone the keys to the castle of this router.

A few years ago, it was discovered the WPS pin was extremely insecure anyway, able to be brute-forced in a matter of minutes. There are patches router manufacturers could apply to detect these brute force attacks, closing that vulnerability. [Craig]‘s code, though, demonstrates that a very large number of D-Link routers effectively broadcast their WPS PIN to the world. To make things even worse, the BSSID found in every wireless frame is also derived from the WAN MAC address. [Craig] has literally broken WPS on a huge number of D-Link routers, thanks to a single engineer that decided to generate the WPS PIN from the MAC address.

[Craig] has an incomplete list of routers that are confirmed affected on his site, along with a list of confirmed unaffected routers.


Filed under: security hacks

Google Play Movies & TV comes to Roku

Liliputing - 6 hours 59 minก่อน

There’s no shortage of ways to watch online video on a TV these days. You can get an Apple TV, an Amazon Fire TV, a Chromecast, a Nexus Player, or any number of cheap Android-powered boxes from China. And of course you could always buy a smart TV from Samsung, LG, or another company and […]

Google Play Movies & TV comes to Roku is a post from: Liliputing

HP and Michael Bastian’s smartwatch launches Nov 7th for $349 and up

Liliputing - 7 hours 46 minก่อน

HP is taking a different approach to the smartwatch space than most other electronics companies. Rather than cram a kitchen sink operating system onto a wristwatch, HP partnered with designer Michael Bastian to design a high-end, stylish watch and then added the hardware to let it talk to your phone. The MB Chronowing is first […]

HP and Michael Bastian’s smartwatch launches Nov 7th for $349 and up is a post from: Liliputing

Deals of the Day (10-31-2014)

Liliputing - 9 hours 14 minก่อน

Lenovo introduced a new 14 inch ThinkPad Yoga this month, but if you’re in the market for something a little smaller you can still find a 12.5 inch model. Lenovo sells ThinkPad Yoga 2-in-1 laptops for $854 and up. But B&H has a great deal on a model with an Intel Core i5 Haswell CPU, […]

Deals of the Day (10-31-2014) is a post from: Liliputing

Hacklet 21 – Halloween Hacks Part 2

Hackaday - 9 hours 59 minก่อน

We asked, you listened! Last weeks Hacklet ended with a call for more Halloween themed projects on Hackaday.io. Some great hackers uploaded awesome projects, and this week’s Hacklet is all about featuring them. Every one of our featured projects was uploaded to Hackaday.io within the last 7 days.

Mass Effect meets Daft Punk in [TwystNeko's] 5-Day SpeedBuild Mass Effect Armor.  As the name implies, [TwystNeko] built the armor in just 5 days. Ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) foam was used to make most of the costume. Usually EVA foam needs to be sealed. To save time, [TwystNeko] skipped that step, and just brushed on some gold acrylic paint.  The actual cuts were based on an online template [TwystNeko] found. To top the armor off, [TwystNeko] used a custom built Daft Punk Guy Manuel helmet. Nice!

 

[Griff] wins for the creepiest project this week with Rat Bristlebot. Taking a page from the Evil Mad Scientist Labs book, [Griff] built a standard bristlebot based on a toothbrush and a vibrating pager motor. He topped off the bristlebot with a small rubber rat body from the party store. The rat did make the ‘bot move a bit slower, but it still was plenty entertaining for his son. [Griff] plans to use a CdS cell to make the rat appear to scamper when room lights are turned on. Scurrying rats will have us running for the hills for sure!

[MagicWolfi] was created Pumpkin-O-Chain to light up Halloween around the house. This build was inspired by [Jeri Ellsworth's] motion sensing barbot dress from 2011. Pumpkin-O-Chain uses the a similar RC delay line with 74HC14 inverters to make the LEDs switch on in sequence. He wanted the delay to be a bit longer than [Jeri's] though, so he switched to 100K ohm resistors in this build. The result is a nice effect which is triggered when someone passes the PIR motion sensor.

[Petri] got tired of his Jack-o’-lantern candles burning out, so he built his own Pumpkin Light. The light made its debut last year with a Teensy 2.0++ running the show. This year, [Petri] decided to go low power and switched to an MSP430 processor on one of TI’s launchpad boards. With plenty of outputs available on the Teensy and the MSP430, [Petri] figured he might as well use and RGB LED. The new improved Jack-o’-lantern can run for hours with no risk of fire.

We can’t end this week without mentioning [Griff's] updated Crochet Cthulhu Mask. We featured the mask in last week’s Hacklet, and called  [Griff] out for an update. Well, the final project is up, and it looks great! We’re sure [Griff's] son will be raking in the candy this year!

It’s time for trick-or-treating, which means we have to end this episode of The Hacklet. As always, see you next week. Same hack time, same hack channel, bringing you the best of Hackaday.io!


Filed under: Hackaday Columns, Holiday Hacks

First look: Google Nexus 6, Nexus 9, Nexus Player (unboxing)

Liliputing - ศุกร์, 10/31/2014 - 23:28

Google’s latest Nexus smartphone is the company’s biggest and fastest yet, with a 6 inch, high-resolution display and a Qualcomm Snapdragon 805 processor. The latest Nexus tablet sports an 8.9 inch screen and and NVIDIA Tegra K1 64-bit processor, making it one of the first devices to ship with that CPU. And the new Google […]

First look: Google Nexus 6, Nexus 9, Nexus Player (unboxing) is a post from: Liliputing

5W stereo audio amplifier

dangerous prototype - ศุกร์, 10/31/2014 - 22:00

Another project from Rajkumar Sharma of Electronics Lab a 5W Stereo Audio amplifier based on BA5406:

5W Stereo Audio Amplifier project based on BA5406 IC which is suitable for application like stereo radio cassette player, stereo components systems etc.
The Heart of the project, BA5406 is a dual OTL monolithic power IC with two built-in, high output speaker amplifier circuits. High output of 5W×2 can be produced when VCC=12 V and RL=3Ω, and 2.8 W×2 when VCC=9V and RL=3Ω. The BA5406, which uses a high allowable power dissipation package, has a simple heat-sink design.

Amazon acknowledged Fire Phone missteps, isn’t giving up yet

Liliputing - ศุกร์, 10/31/2014 - 21:15

Amazon’s first smartphone hasn’t exactly been a big success story so far. Shortly after launching the Fire Phone, Amazon slashed prices by $200 and the company recently revealed that it had $83 million worth of unsold phones in inventory. But Amazon’t not ready to give up on the smartphone space just yet. In an interview with […]

Amazon acknowledged Fire Phone missteps, isn’t giving up yet is a post from: Liliputing

Dual-mode Avalanche and RF Random Number Generator

Hackaday - ศุกร์, 10/31/2014 - 21:00

[Paul] designed a new open-hardware RNG (random number generator) that includes two sources of entropy in a small package. The first source of entropy is a typical avalanche diode circuit, which is formed by a pair of transistors. This circuit creates high-speed random pulses which are sampled by the onboard microcontroller.

What makes this design unique is a second entropy source: a CC2531 RF receiver. The RF receiver continuously skips around channels in the 2.5Ghz band and measures the RF signal level. The least-significant bit of the signal level is captured and used as a source of entropy. The firmware can be configured to use either source of entropy individually, or to combine both. The firmware also supports optionally whitening the entropy byte stream, which evens out the number of 1’s and 0’s without reducing entropy.

The OneRNG uses the USB-CDC profile, so it shows up as a virtual serial port in most modern operating systems. With the rngd daemon and a bit of configuration, the OneRNG can feed the system entropy source in Linux. [Paul] also has a good writeup about the theory behind the entropy generator which includes images of his schematic. Firmware, drivers, and hardware design files are open-source and are available for download.


Filed under: hardware

Vivo teases a smartphone that’s just 0.15 inches thick

Liliputing - ศุกร์, 10/31/2014 - 20:13

Chinese phone maker Oppo made headlines this week when the company unveiled a phone that’s just 4.85mm (about 0.19 inches) thick. Now rival Vivo might be preparing to launch a phone that’s even thinner. The company shared an image of a new phone on social networking site Weibo this week. It shows a device that’s […]

Vivo teases a smartphone that’s just 0.15 inches thick is a post from: Liliputing

Week in (p)review October 31, 2014

dangerous prototype - ศุกร์, 10/31/2014 - 20:00

Here’s a summary of major developments over the last week. Free PCB Friday is coming up soon.

Coming up:

  • Free PCBs via Facebook on Friday
  • App notes on the weekend
  • Free PCB Sunday
  • Free PCBs via Twitter on Tuesday
  • Weekly roundup and preview every Friday

ArTICL: Arduino TI Calculator Linking Library

dangerous prototype - ศุกร์, 10/31/2014 - 19:01

KermMartian over at Cemetech writes:

The ArTICL library (pronounced “article”) lets Arduino programs send and receive TI link protocol-formatted packets at a low level. In addition, it includes a CBL2 class that lets the calculator emulate either a CBL2 device or a calculator speaking the CBL2 protocol (thanks to Cemetech member CVSoft for helping to make this possible). This means that you can use the Send() and Get() commands on your graphing calculator to control the Arduino, including turning LEDs and motors on and off, reading the state of buttons and switches, and performing measurements with sensors. You could even use the ArTICL library to control a Norland Research robot with an Arduino.

Check out the video after the break.

Raspberry Pi Brings New Life to Some Old Dinosaurs

Hackaday - ศุกร์, 10/31/2014 - 18:00

Reprogramming the behaviors of a person-sized animatronic dinosaur would have to be among the coolest opportunities to be presented with… This is exactly what [Dr. Lucy Rogers] and a group of fellow techies were tasked to accomplish for the Blackgang Chine park located on the Isle of Wight in the UK.

Before the group arrived, the native dinos didn’t do much else than run a preprogrammed routine when triggered by someone’s presence… which needless to say, lacks the appropriate prehistoric dynamism. Seeing that their dated wag, wiggle, and roar response could use a fresh breath of flair, the park’s technical projects coordinator [Mark Butler] began adapting one of the dinosaur’s control boxes to work with a Raspberry Pi. This is when [Lucy] and her group were called upon for a two-day long excursion of play and development. With help and guidance from Raspberry Pi expert, [Neil Ford], the group learned how to use a ‘drag and build’ programing environment called node-RED in order to choreograph new movement sequences for two of the smaller dinosaurs provided for use. The visual nature of node-RED helped those of the Blackgang staff with little programming experience understand the code at work, which aided in their training. Now they can reprogram the dinosaurs with new actions on the fly if needed.

The Pi in the end turned out to be a cost-effective solution which will give the robot dinosaurs a longer, more fulfilling lifespan to roar and frolic on their island home. Check out this video by [Debbie Davies] to see more…

Thanks Ed, for spotting this one!


Filed under: Raspberry Pi, robots hacks

A Better Anonabox with the Beaglebone Black

Hackaday - ศุกร์, 10/31/2014 - 15:00

 

A few weeks ago, Anonabox, the ill-conceived router with custom firmware that would protect you from ‘hackers’ and ‘legitimate governments’ drew the ire of tech media. It was discovered that this was simply an off-the-shelf router with an installation of OpenWrt, and the single common thread in the controversy was that, ‘anyone can build that. This guy isn’t doing anything new.’

Finally, someone who didn’t have the terrible idea of grabbing another off the shelf router and putting it up on Kickstarter is doing just that. [Adam] didn’t like the shortcomings of the Anonabox and looked at the best practices of staying anonymous online. He created a Tor dongle in response to this with a Beaglebone Black.

Instead of using wireless like the Anonabox and dozens of other projects, [Andy] is using the Beaglebone as a dongle/Ethernet adapter with all data passed to the computer through the USB port. No, it doesn’t protect your entire network; only a single device and only when it’s plugged in.

The installation process is as simple as installing all the relevent software, uninstalling all the cruft, and configuring a browser. [Adam] was able to get 7Mb/sec down and 250kb/sec up through his Tor-ified Ethernet adapter while only using 40% of the BBB’s CPU.


Filed under: security hacks

Push Button, Receive Candy (or Death)

Hackaday - ศุกร์, 10/31/2014 - 12:00

Will you be handing out candy on Halloween? Maybe you have a party to attend or kids to take around the neighborhood and can’t be home to answer the bell. You don’t want to be The Dark House With No Candy, ’cause that’s a good way to get TP’d. We’re not exactly sure what [Ben]‘s catalyst was aside from trying to avoid tempting would-be thieves with an unattended bowl on the porch. Whatever the reason, we’re happy to present Candy or Death, his gamified candy (or death)-dispensing machine.

Okay, so it only dispenses candy for now. [Ben] hasn’t quite worked the kinks out of his death ray. He designed it to sit behind a porch-facing window so it can’t be messed with. All trick-or-treaters can do is push the button and take the candy. It’s built around a cereal dispenser that’s modified to be cranked by a piece of round rod driven with a NEMA-17 stepper motor and an Arduino Uno with a motor shield. The candy slides down a length of aluminium rain gutter into a plastic stacking bin, and the whole thing is built into a nice wood frame.

A few adjustments were necessary to keep it from jamming. The dispenser’s hopper uses rubber blades to govern the flow, and he ended up removing a few and trimming the others. [Ben] has an album up of all his build pics and put his code on the gits. Stick around to see videos of the machine from the front and rear.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Holiday Hacks

Improving the Parallax Propeller in an FPGA

Hackaday - ศุกร์, 10/31/2014 - 09:00

The Parallax Propeller is an interesting chip that doesn’t get a lot of love, but since the entire chip was released as open source, that might be about to change: people are putting this chip inside FPGA and modifying the binaries to give the chip functions that never existed in the original.

Last August, Parallax released the source for the P8X32A, giving anyone with an FPGA board the ability to try out the Prop for their own designs. Since then, a few people have put some time in, cleaning up the files, unscrambling ROM images, fixing bugs, and all the general maintenance that an open source microcontroller core requires.

[Sylwester] has grabbed some of the experimental changes found on the Parallax forum and included them as a branch of the Propeller source. There is support for a second 32-bit port, giving the new chip 64 I/O pins, multiply instructions, video generators, hard-coded SD card libraries, and a variant called a microProp that has four cores instead of eight.

You can grab all the updated sources right here and load them up on a DE0 Nano FPGA board. If you’re exceptionally lucky and have the Altera DE2-115 dev board, you’ll also be able to run the upcoming Propeller 2.


Filed under: FPGA, Microcontrollers

Flaming Jack-o’-lanterns Light up the Night

Hackaday - ศุกร์, 10/31/2014 - 06:00

[misterdob] wanted to spice up his Halloween decor, so he built these flaming concrete jack -o’-lanterns to decorate his walkway. He started with the classic plastic jack-o’-lanterns that trick-or-treaters have been using to collect candy for years. [misterdob] filled the plastic pumpkins halfway with concrete mix, then dropped in metal coffee cans. He then filled the pumpkins up to the top with concrete, shaking them up a bit to avoid air pockets.

Once the concrete had set, [misterdob] cut away the plastic revealing nearly perfect concrete duplicates. He used acid stain to color his creations – though it looks like he missed a spot or two.

We have to disagree with [misterdob's] choice of fuels. In fact, we think he was out of his gourd when he picked gasoline for his flaming pumpkins. Seriously though, gasoline is a horrible choice for a fire pot like this for a multitude of reasons. Gas has a particularly foul odor and its fumes are explosive. If a Halloween prankster were to try kicking one of the pumpkins over, not only would they have a broken foot, they’d also be covered in burning gas.

Thankfully, the folks on [misterdob's] Reddit thread had better fuel suggestions – citronella torch cans with lamp oil and wicks, kerosene, or gel fuel would be better suited for these hot pumpkins.

If you still don’t believe how dangerous gas and its fumes can be, check out this video of a bonfire gone wrong (language warning).


Filed under: classic hacks

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