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New Chip Alert: The ESP8266 WiFi Module (It’s $5)

พุธ, 08/27/2014 - 06:49

Every so often we run across something in the Hackaday tip line that sends us scurrying to Google, trying to source a component, part, or assembly. The ESP8266 WiFi module is the latest, made interesting because it pretty much doesn’t exist outside China.

Why is it cool? It’s a WiFi module with an SOC, making it somewhat similar to TI’s CC300 in conception (A.K.A. the thing that makes the Spark Core so appealing), in that a microcontroller on the module takes care of all the WiFi, TCP/IP stack, and the overhead found in an 802.11 network. It’s addressable over SPI and UART, making this an exceptionally easy choice for anyone wanting to build an Internet of Things thing; you can simply connect any microcontroller to this module and start pushing data up to the Internet. Oh, it’s also being sold for $5 in quantity one. Yes, for five dollars you can blink a LED from the Internet. That’s about half the price as the CC3000 itself, and a quarter of the price if you were to build a CC3000 breakout board.

There’s a catch, right, there’s always a catch. Yep. About two hours after this post is published it will be the number one English language Google result for “ESP8266.” As far as the English-speaking world is concerned, there is absolutely nothing to be found anywhere on the Internet on this module.

Seeed Studio recently sold a few of these modules for $7 and has some documentation, including a full datasheet and an AT command set. All the documentation is in Chinese. There’s also an “ESP8266 IoT SDK”, but from a quick glance at the code, this appears to be an SDK for the SOC on the module, not a simple way to connect the module to a microcontroller.

Anyone wanting to grab one of these modules can do so on Ali Express. Anyone wanting to do something with one of these modules will have a much more difficult time, most likely poking and prodding bits randomly with the help of Google translate. Should someone, or even a group of people, want to take up the task of creating a translation of the datasheet and possibly a library, we have a pretty collaborative project hosting site where you can do that. You may organize in the comments below; we’ll also be taking bets as to when a product using the ESP8266 will be found on Kickstarter. My guess is under a month.

Thanks [Liam] for the tip.


Filed under: hardware, wireless hacks

ARM-BMW, The Open Hardware Cortex-M0 Development Board

พุธ, 08/27/2014 - 03:00

[Vsergeev] tipped us about a neat Cortex-M0 based development board with a total BoM cost under $15. It’s called the ARM Bare Metal Widget (ARM-BMW), focuses on battery power, non-volatile storage and debuggability.

The chosen micro-controller is the 50MHz NXP LPC1114DH28 which provides the user with 32kB of Flash, 8kB of SRAM, a 6 channel ADC and I2C/SPI/UART interfaces among others. The ARM-BMW contains a 2Mbyte SPI flash, an I2C I/O expander, several headers for expansion/debug purposes, 4 LEDs, 2 buttons, 2 DIP switches and finally a JTAG/SWD header for flashing and debugging. As you can see in the picture above you may either populate your own HC49UP crystal or use the internal 12MHz RC oscillator.

The platform can be powered using either a USB cable or a LiPo battery. As you can guess it also includes a much-needed battery charger (the MCP73831T) and a switched capacitor DC/DC converter to supply 3.3V. You may find all the files on the hardware or software repositories.


Filed under: ARM, hardware

Retrotechtacular: Turn On the Magic of Colored Light

พุธ, 08/27/2014 - 00:00

Chances are, you take color for granted. Whether or not you give it much thought, color is key to distinguishing your surroundings. It helps you identify fire, brown recluse spiders, and the right resistor for the job.

In the spotlight this week is a 1950s educational film called “This is Color“. It also happens to be a delightful time capsule of consumer packaging from the atomic age. This film was made by the Interchemical Corporation, an industrial research lab and manufacturer of printing inks. As the narrator explains, consistent replication of pigments is an essential part of mass production. In order to conjure a particular pigment in the first place, one must first understand the nature of color and the physical properties of visible light.

Each color that makes up the spectrum of visible rays has a particular wavelength. The five principal colors—red, yellow, green, blue, and violet—make possible thousands of shades and hues, but are only a small slice of the electromagnetic spectrum.

When light encounters a transparent material more dense than air, such as water or glass, it has to change direction and is bent by the surface. This is known as refraction. A straw placed in a glass of water will appear bent below the surface because the air and the water have different refractive indices. That is, the air and water will bend or refract different percentages of the light that permeates them.

When light encounters a smooth, solid surface, reflection is focused in one direction. A rough surface reflects light in all directions because the light hits so many different angles. This phenomenon is the basis for manufacturing knowledge about printing inks, lacquers, dyes, and chemical coatings. This is demonstrated with a coating made from linseed oil and glass that has been ground into a fine powder. Here, the linseed oil acts as a vehicle, and the glass as a pigment of the most basic form: fine particles of an insoluble substance suspended in the linseed oil. The refractive index (RI) of the linseed oil is different from that of air, so the light that permeates it is partially reflected.

If the RI of the pigment is the same as the vehicle, light will pass through to the surface begin coated and there will be no reflection. The coating is transparent. If the surface is white, nearly all the light will be reflected back through the coating. A black surface will reflect almost none of the light.

However, if the RI of the pigment differs from the RI of the vehicle, reflection occurs at each particle of the pigment. If it is thick enough, enough reflection occurs that the surface color will not be visible. The coating is opaque.

To reveal the relationship of colored pigments and light, we are shown the effect of several colors of glass. Each color of glass has all of the spectral colors inherent in it, but only certain colors are passed through while the others are absorbed. This experiment makes it possible to create graphs of the wavelengths that each spectral color transmits.

 

Using a device called a spectrophotometer, which measures the amount of light that is reflected or absorbed by a material at all points in the spectrum, the fine folks at Interchemical Corporation can nail down the exact green they need for a package both initially and for every production run thereafter. We are now equipped to understand the subtractive process of printing the color green: yellow and blue do not make it, but instead leave it. Really, though, they allow it to be transmitted.

Green occurs in the overlap of the reflectance curves of yellow and blue. This is another way of visualizing the subtractive process; we can see from the graphs that blue will absorb the red and yellow wavelengths. Yellow will absorb the blue and violet wavelengths, which only leaves green.

There is another way to invoke green, and it is used in color television screens. A checkerboard distribution of yellow and blue squares will, from a distance, blend together within the human eye. This is known as additive color mixing. This average of the reflectance curves for yellow and blue produce a certain shade of gray, which can be visualized with a Maxwell disc. Additive color mixture is not a property of light, but instead takes advantage of the way that the eye detects color.

Whether you’re squinting at a resistor or a spider, the important thing to remember is that color is not an intrinsic property of physical objects, it’s an intrinsic property of the visible light that strikes them.

Retrotechtacular is a weekly column featuring hacks, technology, and kitsch from ages of yore. Help keep it fresh by sending in your ideas for future installments.


Filed under: Retrotechtacular

An iPod Dock Converted into Chromecast Speakers

อังคาร, 08/26/2014 - 21:00

[easybakejake] figured out a way to fuse together an iPod speaker dock and a wireless Chromecast receiver. His method utilized a modified HDMI-to-VGA adapter. From the looks of it, apps like music for Google Play, Pandora, and Music All Access seem to able to be streamed through this device.

A few problems did come up with this project though when researching the functionality of this music hack. For one, there is little to no documentation since the tip came to us through a Reddit post. Another inconvenience had to do with supporting different monitor sizes. [easybakejake] confirmed in the comments of that post that he ran into an error where the input was not working; probably due to a resolution issue. Eventually, he got it working and dubbed the device the MusicBox. Now stick it on a roomba and get it to DJ a party (like this Parks and Recreation skit that follows after the break):


Filed under: musical hacks

Laser Engraved Business Cards with LEDs

อังคาร, 08/26/2014 - 18:00

Regular paper business cards are boring. They are flimsy and easily forgettable for the most part, and when stacked together or thrown in a pile, it’s hard to locate a specific one; like trying to find a needle in a haystack. Plastic cards aren’t much better either because they still fall into that ‘who cares’ category. But plexiglas business cards with laser cut etchings beautifully lit up by an LED?! Yes please.

The design was developed by Romanian engraving company called Gravez Dotro who fixed the problem of simply glancing at a business card, putting it in a wallet, and causally forgetting about it later, never to contact the person that gave it out. If someone hands away one of these though, the receiver is definitely going to remember it. The solution isn’t that high-tech and just about anyone with access to a laser cutter can make their own. It will be interesting to see what people come up with. If you feel like creating one, be sure to send us pictures. We would love to see them. Video of the design comes up after the break.

Also check out the Ask Hackaday article about paper USB business cards by [Mathieu Stephan]


Filed under: laser hacks

Custom Racing Chair with a Kinect and Haptic Feedback

อังคาร, 08/26/2014 - 15:00

The people at Two Bit Circus are at it again; this time with a futuristic racing simulator where the user controls the experience. It was developed by [Brent Bushnell] and [Eric Gradman] along with a handful of engineers and designers in Los Angeles, California. The immersive gaming chair utilized an actual racing seat in the design, and foot petals were added to give the driver more of a feeling like they were actually in a real race. Cooling fans were placed on top for haptic feedback and a Microsoft Kinect was integrated into the system as well to detect hand gestures that would control what was placed on the various screens.

The team completed the project within in thirty days during a challenge from Best Buy who wanted to see if they could create the future of viewing experiences. Problems surfaced throughout the time frame though creating obstacles surrounding the video cards, monitors, and shipping dates. They got it done and are looking towards integrating their work into restaurants like Dave & Buster’s and other facilities like arcades and bars (at least that’s the rumor going around town). The 5 part mini-series that was produced around this device can be seen after the break:

Two Bit Circus also developed this ‘Human Asteroids‘ game with the help of a laser projector and a Microsoft Kinect.


Filed under: Tech Hacks

Prove Your Geek Cred With A Binary Watch

อังคาร, 08/26/2014 - 12:00

After just one prototype, [Elia] has finished his super awesome Binary Wrist Watch.

He designed the PCB in KiCad, using a template for the PIC he found in a standard library — unfortunately it turns out the SSOP-20 PIC footprint in this library was actually a TSSOP-20. Confusingly enough, there was also a TSSOP-20 footprint in the library. Luckily it’s just a few millimeters off so [Elia] was able to just bend the pins in a bit before reflow soldering it in place.

The trickiest part of the project was actually making the wristband. He tried several different styles before settling on a paracord braid design he found on Instructables.

We especially like his quote at the end of the project:

Although not having worn the watch in the presence of normal humans, I can already guarantee that now everyone will be able to easily identify me as a nerd.

Acceptance is the first step in realizing you have an addiction, right?

[via Dangerous Prototypes]


Filed under: Microcontrollers

PiAware, Automated Airliner Tracking On The Raspberry Pi

อังคาร, 08/26/2014 - 09:00

For the sufficiently geeky aviation nerd there’s FlightAware, a website that tracks just about every airliner and most private planes currently in flight. The folks at FlightAware compile all the information with the help of a few thousand volunteers around the world that have a bit of hardware to listen to ADS-B transmissions and relay them to the FlightAware servers. Now you can do this with a Raspberry Pi, and as a nice little bonus FlightAware is giving away free enterprise accounts to anyone who does.

Listening in on ADS-B transponders is something Raspberry Pis have been doing for a while, but doing anything useful with the altitude, speed, heading, and registry numbers of various planes flying overhead is pretty much FlightAware’s only reason for existing, and the reason they’ve developed an easy to use software package for the Pi.

Setting everything up requires getting dump1090 running on the Pi, the only hardware required being an RTL-SDR USB TV tuner, a GPS module, and an antenna for 1090 MHz. From there, just send all the data to FlightAware and you get a free enterprise account with them. Not a bad deal for the aviation nerds out there.


Filed under: radio hacks

Impressive Homemade Segway Is The Real Deal

อังคาร, 08/26/2014 - 06:00

[Kristian] just put the finishing touches on his full size Segway built from scratch.

Back in 2012, he made a small balancing robot using a gyroscopic sensor and a PID controller — you can see the original post here. The cool thing is, he’s basically just scaled up his original project to create this full-size Segway!

It uses two 500W 24V DC motors (MY1929Z2) on an aluminum check plate frame, with the rest of the structure made from steel plumbing and fittings. What we really like is the steering linkage; similar to a real Segway, you pull the handle in the direction you want to turn. He’s accomplished this by putting another length of pipe parallel to the wheels which is connected by an elbow fitting to the handle bar. It’s supported by two pillow block bearings, and in the back is a fixed potentiometer — when you lean the handle bars one way, the pipe rotates, spinning the potentiometer. To make it return to neutral, he’s added springs on either side.

There’s an impressive build log to go along with it, and a great demonstration video after the break.

He’s even written an Android app for tuning the PID values while driving it!

[Thanks Sigurd!]


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, transportation hacks

50 Semifinalists Selected for Next Stage of The Hackaday Prize

อังคาร, 08/26/2014 - 03:01

Who cares about Open Design and building the next generation of Connected Devices? It turns out a lot of people do!

The Hackaday Prize put out the call for Open, Connected design ideas and around 800 projects were posted over the last few months to answer that call. The cutoff for documenting your concept and making entry to the contest was just before midnight last Wednesday. Since then our crew has been going through the entries to select 50 to move on as Semifinalists. Here’s who made the cut:

This list of 50 semifinalists will have until 11:50pm PDT on September 28th, 2014 to refine their designs. Congratulations!

You simply must read the Official Rules for all the details about becoming a finalist during the next round of judging. But we can certainly share some pointers we learned from judging the full pool of entries. The video is your time to make your project shine; tell this awesome panel of judges what the project is, why you’re building it, exactly how it is “connected”, and any thoughts you have on future uses or derivatives of the idea. Project logs insight regarding the feasibility of seeing the hardware finished so keep up with those as your build progresses. And as you near the deadline, hone your project Images, Description, and Details to best engage the judges and readers. Keep the updates coming because everyone is excited to find out who it is that will earn a trip to space!

Semifinalists (alphabetical):

This list of semifinalists is presented in alphabetical order by title.

All of these entrants have done great work so far. Good luck as your builds move forward. The clock is already ticking!

UPDATE: I forgot to mention… those hundreds of other prizes that we’ve been mentioning all along will be awarded to all of the entries. If you officially submitted your project before the deadline you will be rewarded for being a Quarterfinalist. Watch for a post later in the week about exactly what and how we’ll be getting it to you. We just need to make sure we have the logistics sorted out before giving out the details. Thanks!


Filed under: cons, Featured, The Hackaday Prize

Homemade Hot Water Shower Might Shock You

อังคาร, 08/26/2014 - 00:00

[Stephen] doesn’t have the luxury of readily available hot water in his apartment, and since he’s just renting he didn’t want to buy one of those instant powered units, so he decided to go ahead and build his own!

He’s using a submersible 1000W immersion heater in a 2.5 gallon water container which has been mounted high up in his bathroom to let gravity do the work for actual shower. It’s not quite an instant shower unit as the water needs to heat up like a kettle before being used — this takes about 4 minutes to hit the optimum temperature.

The current shower head installed drains the tank in about 2.5 minutes, which might not seem like much time for a shower, but let’s be honest — we could all probably cut back our shower time and save some water for the environment! Something one of our Hack a Day Prize entries is hoping to solve through music!

Oh and the shocking bit? Don’t use the water when the heater is on…


Filed under: how-to

Chromecast Is Root

จันทร์, 08/25/2014 - 21:00

Image from [psouza4] on the xda-developers forum

Chromecast is as close as you’re going to get to a perfect device – plug it in the back of your TV, and instantly you have Netflix, Hulu, Pandora, and a web browser on the largest display in your house. It’s a much simpler device than a Raspi running XBMC, and we’ve already seen a few Chromecast hacks that stream videos from a phone and rickroll everyone around you.

Now the Chromecast has been rooted, allowing anyone to change the DNS settings (Netflix and Hulu users that want to watch content not available in their country rejoice), and loading custom apps for the Chromecast.

The process of rooting the Chromecast should be fairly simple for the regular readers of Hackaday. It requires a Teensy 2 or 2++ dev board, a USB OTG cable, and a USB flash drive. Plug the Teensy into the Chromecast and wait a minute. Remove the Teensy, plug in the USB flash drive, and wait several more minutes. Success is you, and your Chromecast is now rooted.

Member of Team-Eureka [riptidewave93] has put up a demo video of rooting a new in box Chromecast in just a few minutes. You can check that out below.


Filed under: Android Hacks, home entertainment hacks

Ask Hackaday: Can Paper USB Business Cards Exist?

จันทร์, 08/25/2014 - 18:00

The swivelCard Kickstarter campaign recently received a lot of press coverage and makes some impressive claims as their goal is the development of USB and NFC business cards at a $3 unit price. While most USB-enabled business cards we featured on Hackaday were made of standard FR4, this particular card is made of paper as the project description states the team patented

a system for turning regular paper into a USB drive.

As you can guess this piqued our interest, as all paper based technologies we had seen until now mostly consisted of either printed PCBs or paper batteries. ‘Printing a USB drive on regular paper’ (as the video says) would therefore involve printing functional USB and NFC controllers.

Luckily enough a quick Google search for the patents shown in one of the pictures (patent1, patent2) taught us that a storage circuitry is embedded under the printed USB pads, which may imply that the team had an Application-Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) designed or that they simply found one they could use for their own purposes. From the video we learn that ‘each card has a unique ID and can individually be programmed’ (the card, not the UID) and that it can be setup to open any webpage URL. The latter can even be modified after the card has been handed out, hinting that the final recipient would go to a ‘www.swivelcard.com/XXXX” type of address. We therefore got confused by

Imagine giving your business card with pictures, videos, presentations, and websites for the recipient to interact with!

paragraph that the project description contains.

This leads us to one key question we have: what kind of USB drive can make a given user visit a particular website, given that he may have Linux, Windows, Mac or any other OS? They all have similar USB enumeration processes and different key strokes to launch a browser… our wild guess is that it may be detected as storage with a single html file in it. Unfortunately for us the USB detection process is not included in the video.

Our final question: Is it possible to embed both USB and NFC controllers in a thin piece of paper without worrying about broken ICs (see picture above)? NFC enabled passports have obviously been around for a long time but we couldn’t find the same for USB drives.

Possible or not, we would definitely love having one in our hands!

Edit: One of our kind readers pointed out that this campaign actually is a re-launch of a failed indiegogo one which provides more details about the technology and confirms our assumptions.


Filed under: Ask Hackaday, Hackaday Columns

The Handsfree Icebucket Challenge Backpack

จันทร์, 08/25/2014 - 15:00

The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge has taken the internet by storm as tv stars, musicians, athletes, kids, students and everyone in between have thrown freezing water all over themselves in an effort to raise awareness (and millions of dollars) to help cure the neurodegenerative disease. So when [Christopher] was challenged by a friend, he decided to make an icebucket backpack that would pour the liquid from above without having to use his hands.

The wearable device uses a Barometric pressure sensor that is triggered when air is blown into a tube. This sensor is attached to an Arduino Uno. Once activated, the pouring process begins drenching the person below in ice cold water. It’s a little unnecessary, but it gets the job done in a fun, maker-style way. Now if you make something similar, don’t forget to actually support the cause and donate money.

To see the icebucket backpack in action, check out the video after the break:



Filed under: wearable hacks

A Virtual Touchscreen (3D Ultrasonic Radar)

จันทร์, 08/25/2014 - 12:00

Producing items onto a screen simply by touching the air is a marvelous thing. One way to accomplish this involves four HC-SR04 ultrasonic sensor units that transmit data through an Arduino into a Linux computer. The end result is a virtual touchscreen that can be made at home.

The software of this device was developed by [Anatoly] who translated hand gestures into actionable commands. The sensors attached to the Arduino had an approximate scanning range of 3m, and the ultrasonic units were modified to broadcast an analog signal at 40 kHz. There were a few limitations with the original hardware design as [Anatoly] stated in the post. For example, at first, only one unit was transmitting at a time, so there was no way the Arduino could identify two objects on the same sphere. However, [Anatoly] updated the blog with a 2nd post showing that sensing multiple items at once could be done. Occasionally, the range would be finicky when dealing with small items like pens. But besides that, it seemed to work pretty well.

Additional technical specifications can be found on [Anatoly]‘s blog and videos of the system working can be seen after the break.

[Thanks for the tip João!]


Filed under: Tech Hacks

Open Source Marker Recognition for Augmented Reality

จันทร์, 08/25/2014 - 09:00

[Bharath] recently uploaded the source code for an OpenCV based pattern recognition platform that can be used for Augmented Reality, or even robots. It was built with C++ and utilized the OpenCV library to translate marker notations within a single frame.

The program started out by focusing in on one object at a time. This method was chosen to eliminate the creation of additional arrays that contained information of all of the blobs inside the image; which could cause some problems.

Although this implementation did not track marker information through multiple frames, it did provide a nice foundation for integrating pattern recognition into computer systems. The tutorial was straightforward and easy to ready. The entire program and source code can be found on Github which comes with a ZERO license so that anyone can use it. A video of the program comes up after the break:

 


Filed under: software hacks, video hacks

Hackaday Links: August 24, 2014

จันทร์, 08/25/2014 - 06:00

Remember those ‘cocktail’ arcade cabinets? The Ikea Lack table has existed for years, so why not make one into an arcade table? Raspberry Pi with RetroPie as the brains,  and an ancient 4:3 monitor as the display.

Old Unixes! Running on PDPs, Novas, and IBMs! Thanks to Simh, you can emulate these old machines. [Matt] put up a guide to getting Simh running on a Pi that includes running Unix V5 on an emulated PDP-11.

Ever wanted to run your own telecom? The folks at Toorcamp did just that, 50 lines, 10,000 feet of 1-pair, and 1,500 feet of 2-pair. There’s a facebook album of all the pics.

Remember last week when Sparkfun said they shipped 2000 Microviews without a bootloader? Make interviewed [Marcus Schappi], the guy behind the MicroView. There’s also a tutorial on how to fix the issue.

Barbie needs an exorcism.

Remember the [Lord Vetinari] clock from way back when? It’s a clock that ticks 86400 times a day, but the interval between each second is just slightly random and enough to drive people insane. Here’s a kit on Tindie that makes it pretty easy to build a Ventinari clock, or a variety of other clocks that are sufficiently weird. There’s also a martian clock that’s 39 minutes and 36 seconds longer than normal, perfect for the folks at JPL.

0x1f 0x000 IZO EMESS 1407981609


Filed under: Hackaday links

A Geiger Counter for an Off-Road Apocalypse Vehicle

จันทร์, 08/25/2014 - 03:00

If the world comes to an end, it’s good to be prepared. And let’s say that the apocalypse is triggered by a series of nuclear explosions. If that is the case, then having a Geiger counter is a must, plus having a nice transport vehicle would be helpful too. So [Kristian] combined the two ideas and created his own Geiger counter for automotive use just on the off chance that he might need it one day.

It all started with a homemade counter that was fashioned together. Then a display module with a built-in graphics controller that was implemented to show all kinds of information in the vehicle. This was done using a couple of optocouplers as inputs. In addition, a CAN bus interface was put in place. As an earlier post suggests, the display circuit was based on a Microchip 18F4680 microcontroller. After that, things kind of got a little out of control and the counter evolved into more of a mobile communications center; mostly just because [Kristian] wanted to learn how those systems worked. Sounds like a fun learning experience! Later the CPU and gauge was redesigned to use low-quiescent regulators. A filtering board was also made that could kill transients and noise if needed.

The full project can be seen on [Kristian]‘s blog.


Filed under: transportation hacks

Recognizing Speech From Gyroscope Signals

จันทร์, 08/25/2014 - 00:00

A gyroscope is a device made for measuring orientation and can typically be found in modern smartphones or tablet PCs to enable rich user experience. A team from Stanford managed to recognize simple words from only analyzing gyroscope signals (PDF warning). The complex inner workings of MEMS based gyroscopes (which use the Coriolis effect) and Android software limitations only allowed the team to only sniff frequencies under 200Hz. This may therefore explain the average 12% word recognition rate that was achieved with custom recognition algorithms. It may however still be enough to make you reconsider installing an app that don’t necessarily need access to the on-board sensors to work. Interestingly, the paper also states that STMicroelectronics currently have a 80% market share for smartphone / Tablet PCs gyroscopes.

On the same topic, you may be interested to check out a gyroscope-based smartphone keylogging attack we featured a couple of years ago.


Filed under: security hacks

The Counter-Strike Airsoft Robot

อาทิตย์, 08/24/2014 - 21:01

[Jon] and his brother converted an RC car into a robot that can fire airsoft pellets into the air. The little motorized vehicle was disassembled and a handheld was attached to the top. A pulling mechanism was put in place and a safety procedure was added to make sure no accidents occurred.

An Arduino was used to get the servo working, and a chassis stand was created to hold the handle. The setup was then tested at this point, and a Raspberry Pi server was configured to install a motion sensing camera that would act as the eyes for the robot. Once everything was in place, the wheels hit the ground and the vehicle was able to move around, positioning itself to aim the servos at a designated target. Footage was transmitted via the web showing what the robot was looking at.

A video of the remote-controlled counter-strike robot can be seen after the break. You could consider this your toy army. That makes this one your toy air force.


Filed under: toy hacks

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