Hackaday

Syndicate content Hackaday
Fresh hacks every day
ถูกปรับปรุง 21 min 19 sec ก่อน

The Hacklet #6 – Lasers

เสาร์, 07/05/2014 - 01:00

This week’s Hacklet is all about lasers, which have been shining a monochromatic light for hackers since 1960. The first working laser was demonstrated by [Theodore Maiman], who was a hacker / maker himself, having learned circuits in his father’s home electronics lab. It’s no surprise that lasers have been hugely popular in the hacker community ever since.

[Maiman's] first laser was pumped with flash tubes, which is similar to the YAG laser in [macona's] project to restore a laser welder. He’s gotten his hands on a 1985 model 400W Lumonics laser welder. This welder was originally bought by Tektronix to weld titanium CRT flanges. Time moved on, and the welder was sold to [macona's] company, who used it until the Anorad control system died. There was an effort to bring it up to date with new servos and an OpenCNC control system, but the job was never finished. This laser sat for 12 years before [macona] bought it, and now he’s bringing it back to life with LinuxCNC. The project is off to a blazing start, as he already has the laser outputting about 200 Watts.

On the slightly lower power side of things we have [ThunderSqueak's] 5mW visible red (650nm) laser. [ThunderSqueak] needed an alignment laser with decent focusing optics for her other projects. She mounted a module in a plastic case and added a switch. A quick build, but it’s paying dividends on some of her bigger projects – like her Low Cost CO2 Laser Build, which we featured on the blog back in May.

 

[phil] used buildlog 2.x as the inspiration for his Simple DIY laser cutter. The laser power comes from a low cost K40 laser tube and head. His frame is aluminum extrusion covered with Dibond, an aluminum composite material used in outdoor signs. Locomotion comes from NEMA 17 stepper motors. Many of [phil's] parts are machined from HDPE plastic, though it looks like they could be 3D printed as well. We bet this one will be a real workhorse when it’s done.

 

[ebrithil] is working on a combo laser engraver/PCB etcher which will use a solid state laser module. His layout is the standard gantry system seen on many other mills and 3D printers. Dual steppers on the Y axis increase avoid the need for a central belt. His Z axis was donated by an old DVD drive. It has enough power to lift a pen, and should be plenty accurate for focusing duty. He’s already run a couple of great tests with a low power violet laser and glow in the dark material.

[Mario] is creating an incredibly versitile laser tool in his OpenExposer, which can do everything from stereolithography 3D printing to making music as a laser harp. The genius here is [Mario's] reuse of laser printer parts. Every laser printer uses the same basic setup: a laser, a scanning mirror, and optics to stretch the beam out to a full page width. [Mario] is already getting some great prints from OpenExposer. This project is one to watch in The Hackaday Prize.

[fl@C@] is digging into the physics side of things with his DIY 3D Printable RaspberryPi Raman Spectrometer. Raman Spectrometers are usually incredibly expensive pieces of requirement which can tell us which elements make up a given material sample. [fl@C@'s] laser is a 532nm 150mW laser, which bounces through a dizzying array of mirrors and lenses. The resulting data is crunched by a Raspberry Pi to give a full spectrographic analysis. [fl@C@'s] entered his project in The Hackaday Prize, and we featured his bio back in June.

That’s it for this week’s Hacklet, until next week, don’t just sit around wondering why aren’t lasers doing cool stuff. Make it happen, and post it up on Hackaday.io!

 


Filed under: Hackaday Columns

Another Ball Sucking Machine Leaves You Wanting More

ศุกร์, 07/04/2014 - 23:00

[Niklas] told us about his newest art project that he is calling a Pneumatic Sponge Ball Accelerator. This isn’t a home workshop type of project, it is a full fledged art exhibit displayed at the Tschumi Pavilion in Groningen / The Netherlands. One-thousand black sponge balls move from a big glass ball-reservoir bubble to another via a 150 meter long track of clear plastic tubing. The balls move up to an impressive 4 meters a second. Admirers of the installation can operate the machine and its airflow from outside the pavilion by pressing their hand up to a touch sensor installed on the wall of the exhibit.

All of the ball movement is powered by an ordinary home vacuum. Since it would be a short display if all the balls traveled in one direction, ending up in just one of the glass bubbles, [Niklas] came up with a simple yet functional valve that reverses the flow of air in the tube. This is done by a rotatable disk with two holes in it. Depending on its position, it connects one of the two bubble to the vacuum, leaving the other vented to outside atmosphere. Since the vacuum side of the path is low pressure and the ambient atmosphere is relative high pressure, the air travels towards the vacuum bringing the foam balls with it. No balls get sucked into the vacuum because the outlet tube is at the top of each bubble.

 

Find two videos after the break, they are well worth watching.

Are you wondering what it would be like to travel through this contraption? Wonder no longer as this video provides a first person point of view thanks to a tiny camera stuffed inside a custom foam-covered capsule:

We’ve previously covered a ball sucking machine here on Hackaday that [Niklas] acknowledges was partial inspiration for his project.


Filed under: misc hacks

Astronaut Or Astronot: Givin’ Away Scopes

ศุกร์, 07/04/2014 - 22:02

Remember how we said we’d give away an oscilloscope to a random person on hackaday.io if they have voted on projects for The Hackaday Prize? Last week we tried that and no one won. This week we tried it and no one won. Then, because we’re awesome, we picked another person at random on Hackaday.io. [Rafael] is the winner, with a very nice oscilloscope heading to his doorstep. We’re going to need some contact info, hacker no. 13951, and if anyone has any advice on sending expensive electronics to Brazil, I think we’re going to need it.

We’re doing this again next week, so head on over to hackaday.io and vote. Also, pay no attention to the people who say voting is too hard and complicated and ill planned: they are wrong, and if you suck up enough the Prime Overlord will command that t-shirts and stickers be sent out to you.


Filed under: The Hackaday Prize

TI’s New Family Of WiFi Chips

ศุกร์, 07/04/2014 - 21:00

Texas Instruments’ CC3000 WiFi chip is the darling of everyone producing the latest and greatest Internet of Thing, and it’s not much of a surprise: In quantity, these chips are only $10 a piece. That’s a lot less expensive than the WiFi options a year ago. Now, TI is coming out with a few new modules to their WiFi module family, including one that includes an ARM micro.

The CC3000 has found a home in booster packs, breakout boards for the Arduino, and Spark, who are actually some pretty cool dudes.Still, the CC3000 has a few shortcomings; 802.11n isn’t available, and it would be really cool if the CC3000 had a web server on it.

The newest chips add these features and a whole lot more. [Valkyrie] got his hands on a CC3100Boost board and was pleased to find all the files for the webserver can be completely replaced. Here’s your Internet of Things, people. The CC3200 is even better, with a built-in ARM Cortex M4 with ADCs, a ton of GPIOs, an SD card interface, and even a parallel port for a camera. If you’re looking to pull a hardware startup out of your hat, you might want to plan your Kickstarter around this chip.

It’s all very cool stuff, and although the bare chips aren’t available yet, you can get an eval module from TI, with an FCC certified module with the crystals and antenna coming later this year.


Filed under: hardware

Angry Birds Sentry Gun has Pigs Flying

ศุกร์, 07/04/2014 - 18:01

[Farlei Heinen] has a C programming class at school. Not wanting to do another boring cookie-cutter project out of the textbook, he decided to do something different — he’s built an Arduino controlled sentry gun!

It consists of two parts: The sentry gun itself and a sonar detection tower which can tell if you’ve successfully knocked down the pigs or not. He’s using an Arduino Mega at the heart of the project, which controls the servos and reads information off of the sonar sensors.

The sentry gun uses two servo motors to control up and down, and left and right. The loading mechanism is manual, using elastic bands to launch the projectile. The firing mechanism however is a micro (9g) servo, which can release the elastic and shoot the projectile. The target is an Angry Birds toy play set made for kids.

It’s a pretty cool project, and [Farlei] has even released the source code for it if you’re interested in building your own — check it out in action, after the break!


Filed under: Arduino Hacks

Solderdoodle is an Open Source, USB Rechargable Soldering Iron

ศุกร์, 07/04/2014 - 15:01

Battery powered soldering irons are nothing new, but what about a soldering iron that can recharge via USB? [Solarcycle] realized that it might be handy to be able to recharge a portable soldering iron using such a ubiquitous connector and power source, so he developed the Solderdoodle.

The core component of the Solderdoodle is a Weller BP645 Soldering Iron. The heating element is removed from the Weller and placed into a custom case. The case is designed to be 3d printed. The STL files for the case are available if you want to make your own.

The Solderdoodle does away with large, disposable batteries and replaces them with a lithium ion battery pack. The battery contains no built-in protection circuitry in order to save space. Instead, this circuit is added later. [Solarcycle] appears to be using a circuit of his own design. The schematic and Gerber’s are available on his website.

The Instructable walks through all of the steps to build one of these yourself if you are so inclined. If you don’t have the spare time, you can fund the project’s Kickstarter and pre-order a production model. It’s always great to see a new commercial product with an open design.

[via Reddit]


Filed under: Crowd Funding, tool hacks

Don’t Blink, Ken… Or The Weeping Barbie Will Get You

ศุกร์, 07/04/2014 - 12:00

That which holds the image of an Angel becomes itself an Angel. Have fun with that.

Barbie dolls have been around since 1959, but never before have they been this terrifying. [anthropolywog] decided to kick the creepy factor up a notch by modifying some poor, defenseless Barbie dolls into weeping angels.

If you aren’t familiar with the weeping angel concept, you probably don’t watch Dr. Who. The weeping angel episode, titled “Blink“, is now considered a classic Dr. Who episode. The basic premise is that some creepy, weeping stone statues can move only when no one is looking at them. Even closing your eyes for a moment to blink is enough to get them to move. It’s actually quite terrifying, but also awesome.

[anthropolywog] started by purchasing several ordinary Barbie dolls. She then cut off all of the arms at the elbow. This is because the Barbie arms do not normally bend at the elbow, and this was required to get that classic weeping angel pose. The hair was glued up into a bun, similar to the weeping angels from the show. The Barbies were then hot glued to wooden stands to make it easier to work on them.

Crinkle cotton fabric was then cut into a simple dress shape and draped over the dolls. The entire doll was then sprayed with a mixture of Elmer’s glue and water. This stiffens up the fabric and makes the whole thing look more statuesque.

The most complicated part was the wings. [anthropolywog] hand-made the wings from cardboard and craft feathers. This process took several hours of work in order to get something that would look right.

The dolls were primed for paint separately from the wings. The wings were then attached, and the whole doll was painted with “natural stone” textured spray paint. The final touch was to re-draw the faded eyes and mouths with a fine tipped permanent marker. You can see in the photo that the result turned out very well.

[via Reddit]


Filed under: misc hacks

DIY Headphone Tube Amp Builds On Existing Design

ศุกร์, 07/04/2014 - 09:00

[Simon] wrote in to tell us about a headphone tube amp that he just built. It is based on schematics at diyaudioprojects.com that were actually featured on Hackaday in the past. [Simon's] design adds an on board regulated power supply and a volume control for the input. Effort was made to keep the PCB single sided to facilitate making this at home.

The 12AU7 is popular due to its ruggedness and tolerance for low operational voltages. This amp design uses a plate voltage of 12, although the 12AU7 can handle up to about 330.  Since the 12AU7 is of the Twin Triode variety, one tube can be used to amplify both a left and right audio channel.

The case for the amplifier is laser cut plywood. The top piece is kerfed so that it can bend around the radii of the front and rear panels. The top also has a hole cut in it to allow the tube to peek out through.The pieces look nice but, unfortunately, he doesn’t show the case and amp in an assembled state.

If you’re interested in building one of these, [Simon] made all of the Eagle and Case files available. The total cost of the project was £25, about $43 US. To learn more about how tube amplifiers work, check out this Retrotechtacular from earlier in the year.


Filed under: musical hacks

Brighten Your Day with Studio Strobe Power Hack

ศุกร์, 07/04/2014 - 06:00

[OiD] picked up a couple of cheap studio strobes off eBay and was not happy with the power control. So he rewired it. These lights are like supercharged flashes for professional photographers, and contain some very large capacitor banks. His first hack didn’t work out too well, and he wound up welding the innards of a switch together. He was successful however, in his second attempt to tame the large voltages.

He’s using two 1N5408 diodes, which are rated at 3 amps, for charging the capacitor bank. A massive 60EPS08 diode, rated at 60 amps with a Frankenstein worthy surge rating of 950 amps is used to separate the charge between the two capacitor banks, and allows one to discharge into the flash tube.

Consisting of just a handful of components, [OiD]‘s hack greatly improves the performance of the strobe’s power adjustment settings. He does an excellent job at documenting the hack for all to see. Be sure to check out his bog for full details.


Filed under: misc hacks

Astronaut or Not — Voter Lottery Tomorrow!

ศุกร์, 07/04/2014 - 04:38

Fair warning, if you haven’t voted on Astronaut or Not you may come up short tomorrow. [Brian] will once again draw a random hacker number at 10am EDT (GMT -4).

If that hacker has voted in this round (we’re still in the first round of voting) they will win this fabulous oscilloscope. If they haven’t voted… no fancy scope for you!

We’re hoping to close this round of voting early next week at which time we’ll award prizes to the projects that received the most votes and start another round with a different theme.


Filed under: contests, The Hackaday Prize

Fail of the Week: Blown Light Bulb Controllers

ศุกร์, 07/04/2014 - 03:01

We’ve been meaning to get around to this one for many weeks now. It’s been hard to find good fail write-ups… it’s as if hackers are afraid to admit that sometimes projects fail. We hope you’ll shake off that opinion as failure is the fastest path for learning and true understanding!

[xymax] was working on a control system for a chandelier with 150 bulbs which use 5 Watts each. This project was being readied for the NYC Resistor Interactive Party which [Adam Fabio] attended last month. As deadline for the show approached, the last piece was put in place late into the night… but it was connected backwards. In a tale worthy of a slapstick movie, the reverse polarity caused a chip on all seven controller boards for this module to blow like the one seen above. But that’s not all, the laptop being used during prototyping was connected by USB and started smoking!

All of us feel the pain of this type of equipment failure. Luckily [xymax] looked for lessons to learn instead of dwelling on the mistake itself. Use protection diodes, keyed connectors, and write about your failures. Hopefully reading this will help others avoid a similar equipment-destroying mistake.

Fail of the Week is a Hackaday column which runs every Thursday. Help keep the fun rolling by writing about your past failures and sending us a link to the story – or sending in links to fail write ups you find in your Internet travels.


Filed under: Fail of the Week, Hackaday Columns

XOXO for the OCXO

ศุกร์, 07/04/2014 - 00:01

[Kerry Wong] recently got himself a frequency counter. Not just any counter, a classic Hewlett-Packard 5350B Microwave Counter. This baby will go 10Hz all the way up to 20GHz with only one input shift. A true fan of Hackaday Prize judge [Dave Jones], [Kerry] didn’t turn it on, he took it apart. In the process, he gave us some great pictures of late 80′s vintage HP iron.

Everything seemed to be in relatively good working order, with the exception of the oven indicator, which never turned off. The 5350B had three time bases available: a Thermally Compensated Crystal Oscillator (TCXO),  an Oven Controlled Crystal Oscillator (OCXO), and a high stability OCXO. [Kerry's] 5350B had option 001, the OCXO. Considering it was only a $750 USD upgrade to the 5350B’s $5500 USD base price, it’s not surprising that many 5350B’s in the wild have this option.

[Kerry] checked the wattage of his 5350B, and determined that it pulled about 27 watts at power up and stayed there. If the OCXO was working, wattage would have dropped after about 10 minutes when the oven came up to temperature. Time to tear open an oven!

Armed with a copy of the 5350B service manual from HP’s website, [Kerry] opened up his OCXO. The Darlington transistors used as heaters were fine. The control circuit was fine. The problem turned out to be a simple thermal fuse. The service manual recommended jumping out the fuse for testing. With the fuse jumped, the oven came to life. One more piece of classic (and still very useful) test equipment brought back to full operation.

[via Dangerous Prototypes]


Filed under: classic hacks

THP Hacker Bio: radu.motisan

พฤ, 07/03/2014 - 21:01

Here’s a great example of thinking big while keeping it simple. [Radu Motisan's] putting together a global radiation monitoring network as his entry in The Hackaday Prize.

The simplicity comes in the silver box pictured above. This houses the Geiger tube which measures radiation levels. The box does three things: hangs on a wall somewhere, plugs into Ethernet and power, and reports measurements so that the data can be combined with info from all other functioning units.

After seeing the idea we wanted to know more about [Radu]. His answers to our slate of queries are found below.

Like it often happens, it’s a combination of several hobbies that keeps me in motion. I started with computer science 22 years ago when I was 10, added electronics and chemistry while I was still in my early years, physics and math later in highschool, and then back to computer science for my university studies and later on for my job.

I am a mobile software architect in a private company, it’s the equivalent of a software expert. It’s a title I got to earn after 10 years of experience in my field.

This gets very close to my hobbies, but goes on a slightly different path. I have a passion for knowledge, for life and for the people I care for. If life was not limited I would be fully satisfied. Finding a balance to these, is probably one of my biggest (utopian) dream.

Thanks for getting me back to Earth. Slow computers I had to deal with, buggy mobile phones and all in one technology that annoys me instead of helping me, would surely deserve to be a good target for uber destruction. But I love my equipment and tools and I would never do them harm. I’ve also scrapped many items to get what I needed when components were hard to find, so I’m not sure I could do this.

Mac OS. Because it does a good job while others just try to (and usually fail). I also like small/dedicated RTOS-es that are quick and efficient.

My macbook pro for software and my oscope. Because that’s what I use most and they help me with my tasks more than any other tools. Oh, and I almost forget about my cross screwdriver (it fits the same criteria).

I’m a big fan of microcontrollers, as a software developer I’d say they put the “elegant” attribute to electronics. I’ve used AVRs a lot and I still do.

C because it makes the Earth spin. And all the others, as I had the time to use most of them. I am fond of the saying “the right tool for the right job”. I apply this when deciding what’s the best language and similar things.

  1. An exoskeleton for when getting old.
  2. Learning biology from the software point of view: the telomeres, cell production codes, DNA damage errors, all in one learning to understand ageing as a software bug (or as a disease that needs a cure).
  3. assuming (2) is doable in my lifespan, this last project would probably be taking my wife on a trip to a neighboring galaxy in a few hundred years from now :-)

Computer programming and soldering, but you probably knew I would say that.

I had to think big for a prize of this size, but I also had to keep my sense of reality so the balance was to pick something doable in the given timeframe, as I wanted to present a complete and working solution. Among my ongoing projects, the global radiation network (uRadMonitor) was the best candidate. It’s complex, has scientific and commercial value (so it can be implemented), and brings good to humanity.

I’d love some advise on the hardware production, tips on better design and optimisation, everything that could be put to some practical use for this project. I did make a lot of progress on my own, but some educated tips and know-how are always good to get.

Yes, the exoskeleton idea would be nice to be put to practice, in order to come with a final product what would be reliable and truly helpful to those in need. This would probably be the thing I’d focus on, should I have the time. The power supply is an issue, but for the rest I’d dare to challenge all and fight for a solution. Lots of sensors, pneumatic actuators for all the main muscles and lots of lines of code / clever software, what a spicy and intriguing combination!

I love it all, thanks!

I think I said enough, the beer’s gone and so are the hours. But I’d like to say thanks in the name of the entire community for the THP thing. It’s a great contest, but this is only the label. What’s inside is a great motivation for people all around the world to invest in technology, to dream high and to put their resources into designing some truly amazing things. And this is a gain for the entire humanity. We need more of these things, more support for research, more investments in technology. It’s our best bet for a better tomorrow, and for creating true value. THANK YOU!


Filed under: Hackaday Columns, Interviews, The Hackaday Prize

Custom Controllers For Kerbal Space Program

พฤ, 07/03/2014 - 18:00

Kerbal Space Program is already a runaway indie video game hit, and if you ask some people, they’ll tell you it is the way to learn all about orbital dynamics, how spaceships actually fly, the challenges of getting to the mün. The controls in KSP are primarily keyboard and mouse, something that really breaks the immersion for a space flight simulator. We’ve seen a few before, but now custom controllers well suited for a Kerbal command pod can be made at home, with all the blinkey LEDs, gauges, and buttons you could want.

[Freshmeat] over on the KSP forums began his space adventures with a keyboard but found the fine control lacking. An old Logitech Dual Shock controller offered better control, but this gamepad doesn’t come with a throttle, and USB throttles for flight sims are expensive. He found a neat plugin for KSP made for interfacing an Arduino, and with a few modifications, turned his controller into a control panel, complete with sliders, pots, gauges, and all the other goodies a proper command pod should have.

[Freshmeat]‘s work is not the only custom Kerbal controller. There’s a whole thread of them, with implementations that would look great in everything from a modern spaceplane to kerbalkind’s first steps into the milky abyss of space. There’s even one over on the Hackaday projects site, ready to fly Bill, Bob, and Jeb to the mün or a fiery explosion. Either one works.

Thanks [drago] for the tip.


Filed under: peripherals hacks

Retro Gaming Console, Now With Internet Radio

พฤ, 07/03/2014 - 15:00

Do you ever miss your gaming system of yesteryear? [yv3] did so he built a retro gaming console. Even though [yv3] likes his old school games, he didn’t want to be stuck listening to old school 8-track tapes while playing those games. The solution for him was to build a retro gaming console with integrated internet radio.

The gaming portion of the build relies on RetroPie. The RetroPie disk image contains all of the software and emulators needed to turn a Raspberry Pi into a dedicated retro gaming system. The RetroPie project supports a lot of gaming systems, [yv3] chose to include Atari, Sega Master System and Genesis, NES, SNES, and Turbografx-16.

Raspberry Pi Internet Radio manages the radio portion of this project and is set up to start playing automatically when the unit is powered on. There are 5 buttons to change the station, volume and settings. The radio stations are managed by a text file residing on the SD card. Audio from the radio can be directed to either the HDMI or the analog out of the RaspPi.

Google Sketchup was used to design the case which draws inspiration from the Atari 2600 Junior. All of the internal components were also modeled to make sure they not only fit but the openings in the case were in the correct location. Once the case design was complete, [yv3] laid out the panels on some plywood, cut them out and put them together.

If you’re still hungry for RetroPie projects then check out this one built into a coffee table, this portable ‘Pi or this one thrown in an original NES case.


Filed under: Raspberry Pi

Laser Piano Worthy Of The Band ‘Wyld Stallyns’

พฤ, 07/03/2014 - 12:00

[Robi] and [Kathy] from elecfreaks have put together a how-to article about a Laser Piano they just built. Instead of keys, the user breaks beams of laser light to trigger the sounds.

Several laser pointer diodes are wired in parallel and mounted in a box, cardboard in this case. The laser diodes are aimed at photocells that reside on the other side of the box. Each photocellis connected to a digital input pin on an Arduino. When the Arduino senses a state change from one of the photocell, meaning the beam of light has been interrupted, it plays the appropriate wave file stored on an external JQ6500 sound module.

[Robi] admits that there are some improvements to be made, specifically the trigger response time and the piano sounding too monotonous. If you have any ideas, please leave them in the comments section.

If you’d like to build one, the bill of materials and Arduino code are listed on the above site. We’ve features some other interesting laser-based instruments in the past, such as this guitar, this harp and this harp.

“Be excellent to each other!”

 


Filed under: musical hacks

The Old Ping-Pong Ball Levitation Trick

พฤ, 07/03/2014 - 09:00

[Jacob] has put a slightly new twist on the levitating ball trick with his ping-pong ball levitation machine. We’ve all seen magnetic levitation systems before. Here on Hackaday, [Caleb] built a Portal gun which levitated a Companion Cube. Rather than go the magnetic route, [Jacob] levitated a ping-pong ball on a cushion of air.

Now, it would be possible to cheat here, anyone who’s seen a demonstration of Bernoulli’s principle knows that the ball will remain stable in a stream of air. [Jacob] proves that his system is actually working by levitating ping-pong balls with different weights.

A Parallax Ping style ultrasonic sensor measures the distance between the top of the rig and the levitating ball. If the ball gets above a set distance, [Jacob's] chipKit based processor throttles down his fans. If the ball gets too low, the fans are throttled up. A software based Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) loop keeps the system under control. A graph of the ball distance vs fan speed is displayed on an Android tablet connected to the controller via USB.

When [Jacob] switches a heavy ball for a light one, the lighter ball is pushed beyond the pre-programmed height. The controller responds by reducing the fan speed and the ball falls back. Who said you can’t do anything good with a box of corn dogs?


Filed under: classic hacks

Broken Laptop Lives Again in Skull ‘n Wrenches Arcade Cabinet

พฤ, 07/03/2014 - 06:00

We’re pretty fond of home-built arcade cabinets, especially when those cabinets feature a giant HaD logo on the front. We teased you with a picture of two predators playing it at Maker Faire Kansas City, and we thought you might like to see what makes it tick.

[Dustin and Nick] have dubbed this the Dustin and Nick Arcade [DNA]. They built the cabinet from the ground up out of 5/8″ MDF, primed it, and painted it with exterior paint to ward off moisture damage. At the heart of this build is the bottom half of a laptop that suffered from a broken screen. The plexiglass overlay lets players view the guts of the thing, which we think is a nice touch that literally exemplifies Open Design.

So, what happens when you drop your proverbial coin? [Dustin and Nick] used an C# NES/SNES emulator that runs from the command line using a WPF interface. [Nick]‘s software selects the appropriate emulator for the approximately 700 available games. You’ll find [Nick]‘s code and a ton of build pics at [Dustin]‘s site. No wonder they won a Maker of Merit ribbon!

Don’t have the space to build a full-scale cabinet? You could make a mini Ms. Pac-Man cabinet, but then you’d only have Ms. Pac-Man to play with. And we’re pretty sure she’s spoken for.


Filed under: laptops hacks, nintendo hacks

Don’t Freak Out — Your TODO List for August 4th

พฤ, 07/03/2014 - 04:30

The registration cut-off for The Hackaday Prize is August 4th. But this is not the day you need to have your project finished. You simply need to register your concept before the cutoff. This video walks you through the process, and we’ve included bullet points and links after the break for your convenience.

Here’s what you need to do right away:

As the August 4th, 2014 deadline approaches:

  • Add details to your project page. We’d like to see at least four build logs and build instructions. These are really easy to flesh out — talk about features, hardware choices, libraries you plan to use, etc.
  • Publish a second YouTube or Youku video (again, no more than two minutes) that shows any progress you have made and talks about hardware choices and the features you plan to include in the build. This video should prove to the judges that your concept is viable and will result in a working prototype by the end of the contest in November.

Filed under: contests, Featured, The Hackaday Prize

Pocket Calculator Emulates Pocket Calculator

พฤ, 07/03/2014 - 03:00

[Chris] has built a pocket calculator that emulates… a pocket calculator. Two pocket calculators, in fact. Inspired by [Ken Shirriff's] incredible reverse engineering of the Sinclair scientific calculator, [Chris] decided to bring [Ken's] Sinclair and TI Datamath 2500II simulators to the physical world.

Both of these classic 70′s calculators are based on the TMS0805 processor. The 0805 ran with 320 11-bit words of ROM and only three storage registers. Sinclair’s [Nigel Searle] performed the real hack by implementing scientific calculator operations on a chip designed to be a four function calculator.

[Chris] decided to keep everything in the family by using a Texas Instruments msp430 microcontroller for emulation. He adapted [Ken's] simulator code to run on a MSP430G2452. 256 bytes of RAM and a whopping 8KB of flash made things almost too easy.[Chris'] includes ROMs for both the TI and the Sinclair calculators. The TI Datamath ROM is default, but by holding the 7 key down during boot, the Sinclair ROM is loaded. The silk screen includes key icons for both calculators, as well as some Doge-inspired wisdom on the back.

All joking aside, these really are amazing little calculators. Children of the 60′s and 70′s will be taken back when they see the LEDs flash as the emulated TMS0805 performs algorithmic arithmetic. [Chris'] code is up on Github. While he hasn’t released gerbers yet, he does have images of his PCB layout on the 43oh.com forums.


Filed under: classic hacks, handhelds hacks

Logicthai Shop

LogicStamp8fx ราคา 180 บาท

USB to TTL module ใช้ชิพ PL2303 ราคา 150 บาท

USB Power module พร้อมสาย USB ราคา 70 บาท

ชุดลงปริ้นท์ freeduinomax232ssAtmega168 ราคา 450 บาท

แผ่นปริ้นท์ freeduinomax232ss เกรด A ราคา 70 บาท

ชุดคิท freeduinomax232ssAtmega168 ราคา 320 บาท

สาย RS232 ราคา 70 บาท DC อะแดปเตอร์ 9 volt ราคา 150 บาท

ค่าส่ง EMS 60 บาท

การใช้งานชุด freeduinomax232ss จะต้องประกอบด้วย ตัวบอร์ด, สาย RS232, อะแดปเตอร์ 9 โวลท์ชนิดที่มีขั้วบวกอยู่ตรงกลาง

ผู้สนใจสั่งซื้อสินค้าส่งเมล์มาที่ sales(at)ลอจิกไทยดอทเนท

สมาชิก ส่งรายการสั่งซื้อและที่อยู่โดยเข้าเมนู contact